125+ Walter Scott Quotes Tell Us About The Reverend Author And Historian

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Walter Scott popular quotes

These Walter Scott quotes will tell us about the reverend author and historian. There are so many Walter Scott quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Walter Scott quotes exists just do that.

Walter Scott was conceived in Edinburgh, Scotland, on August 15th in the year 1771, the child of a legal advisor with a long family convention in law. By birth, Walter Scott was associated with both the rising white collar class of Britain and the blue-blooded which was the administering class Walter Scottish legacy at that point going into history. As a tyke, Walter Scott fought polio, a sickness that assaults kids and debilitates their advancement. In spite of the sickness, Walter Scott enjoyed generally dynamic and glad adolescence. During these years Walter Scott built up a profound enthusiasm for writing and perusing, particularly the people stories and legends of his local Scotland. Walter Scott was instructed at Edinburgh University and arranged for a profession in law, however, his actual interests lay in history and writing. During his years at the college, Walter Scott read generally in English and Continental literary works, especially medieval and Renaissance sentiments from the fourteenth to seventeenth hundreds of years. Walter Scott likewise appreciated German sentimental verse and fiction, and the story people sonnets known as ditties.

W. von Goethe’s during 1749-1832 play Götz von Berlichingen in the year 1799 and different interpretations from German; Minstrelsy of the Walter Scottish Border during 1802-1803, a gathering of songs that produced extraordinary enthusiasm for people verse; and a progression of account lyrics, for the most part of recorded activity. This sonnets-including The Lay of the Last Minstrel in the year 1805, Marmion in the year 1808, and The Lady of the Lake in the year 1810- turned out to smash hits, and Walter Scott set up his first abstract notoriety as an artist of the sentimental school, an aesthetic development created in the eighteenth and nineteenth hundreds of years. During these years Walter Scott additionally sought after a legitimate vocation, ascending to the official position of agent of the Court of Session. His tremendous energies enabled him to take part in academic and journalistic exercises. His release and life story of John Dryden during 1631-1700, the English writer and screenwriter, distributed in the year 1808, stays of significant worth. His politically inspired establishing of the Quarterly Review, a scholarly diary, helped make Edinburgh the most persuasive focus of British scholarly life outside London. In these years Walter Scott additionally started to make a home, Abbotsford.

We have dug up these Walter Scott quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Walter Scott Sayings in a single place. These famous Walter Scott quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Walter Scott quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Walter Scott quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences: –

“All men who have turned out worth anything have had the chief hand in their own education.”

Walter Scott quotes

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“Oh, what a tangled web we weave…when first we practice to deceive.”

Walter Scott best quotes

“Cats are a mysterious kind of folk.”

Walter Scott famous quotes

“We are like the herb which flourisheth most when trampled upon”

Walter Scott popular quotes“Many a law, many a commandment have I broken, but my word never.”

Walter Scott saying

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“Revenge, the sweetest morsel to the mouth that ever was cooked in hell.”

“Love rules the court, the camp, the grove, and men below, and the saints above, for love is heaven, and heaven is love. ”

“For he that does good, having the unlimited power to do evil, deserves praise not only for the good which he performs, but for the evil which he forbears.”

“Is death the last sleep? No, it is the last and final awakening.”

“Each age has deemed the new-born year.The fittest time for festal cheer.”

“Fight on, brave knights! Man dies, but glory lives! Fight on; death is better than defeat! Fight on brave knights! for bright eyes behold your deeds!”

“I have heard men talk about the blessings of freedom,” he said to himself, “but I wish any wise man would teach me what use to make of it now that I have it.”

“Oh what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive”

“The misery of keeping a dog is his dying so soon. But, to be sure, if he lived for fifty years and then died, what would become of me?”

“Chivalry!—why, maiden, she is the nurse of pure and high affection—the stay of the oppressed, the redresser of grievances, the curb of the power of the tyrant —Nobility were but an empty name without her, and liberty finds the best protection in her lance and her sword.”

“Silence, maiden; thy tongue outruns thy discretion.”

“I envy thee not thy faith, which is ever in thy mouth but never in thy heart nor in thy practice”

“I have sometimes thought of the final cause of dogs having such short lives and I am quite satisfied it is in compassion to the human race; for if we suffer so much in losing a dog after an acquaintance of ten or twelve years, what would it be if they were to live double that time?”

“Will future ages believe that such stupid bigotry ever existed!”

“The wretch, concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down
To the vile dust, from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonored, and unsung.”

“One hour of life, crowded to the full with glorious action, and filled with noble risks, is worth whole years of those mean observances of paltry decorum, in which men steal through existence, like sluggish waters through a marsh, without either honour or observation.”

“We shall never learn to feel and respect our real calling and destiny, unless we have taught ourselves to consider every thing as moonshine, compared with the education of the heart.”

“A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason; if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.”

“Wounds sustained for the sake of conscience carry their own balsam with the blow.”

“Heap on more wood! – the wind is chill; But let it whistle as it will, We’ll keep our Christmas merry still.”

“I will tear this folly from my heart, though every fibre bleed as I rend it away!”

“One crowded hour of glorious life is worth an age without a name”

“In the name of God!” said Gurth, “how came they prisoners? and to whom?”

“Our master was too ready to fight,” said the Jester, “and Athelstane was not ready enough, and no other person was ready at all.”

“Love will subsist on wonderfully little hope but not altogether without it.”

“It was woman that taught me cruelty, and on woman therefore I have exercised it.”

“The wretch, concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down
To the vile dust from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonored , and unsung.
Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)”

“…having once seen him put forth his strength in battle, methinks I could know him again among a thousand warriors. He rushes into the fray as if he were summoned to a banquet. There is more than mere strength–there seems as if the whole soul and spirit of the champion were given to every blow which he deals upon his enemies. God assoilzie him of the sin of bloodshed! It is fearful, yet magnificent, to behold how the arm and heart of one man can triumph over hundreds.”

“One hour of life, crowded to the full with glorious action, and filled with noble risks, is worth whole years of those mean observances of paltry decorum”

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“Revenge is a feast for the gods!”

“Now, it is well known, that a man may with more impunity be guilty of an actual breach either of real good breeding or of good morals, than appear ignorant of the most minute point of fashionable etiquette.”

“Trade has all the fascination of gambling without its moral guilt.”

“There is no better antidote against entertaining too high an opinion of others than having an excellent one of ourselves at the very same time.”

“Meantime the clang of the bows and the shouts of the combatants mixed fearfully with the sound of the trumpets, and drowned the groans of those who fell, and lay rolling defenceless beneath the feet of the horses. The splendid armour of the combatants was now defaced with dust and blood, and gave way at every stroke of the sword and battle-axe. The gay plumage, shorn from the crests, drifted upon the breeze like snowflakes. All that was beautiful in the martial array had disappeared, and what was now visibke was only calculated to awaken terror or compassion.”

“Of all the train, none escaped except Wamba, who showed upon the occasion much more courage than those who pretended to greater sense.”

“The schoolmaster is termed, classically, Ludi Magister, because he deprives boys of their play.”

“the worst evil which befalls our race is, that when we are wronged and plundered, all the world laughs around, and we are compelled to suppress our sense of injury, and to smile tamely, when we would revenge bravely.”

“Teach you children poetry; it opens the mind, lends grace to wisdom and makes the heroic virtues hereditary.”

“You will, I trust, resemble a forest plant, which has indeed, by some accident, been brought up in the greenhouse, and thus rendered delicate and effeminate, but which regains its native firmness and tenacity, when exposed for a season to the winter air.”

“Patriotism
Breathes there the man with soul so dead,
Who never to himself hath said,
‘This is my own, my native land!’
Whose heart hath ne’er within him burn’d
As home his footsteps he hath turn’d
From wandering on a foreign strand?
If such there breathe, go, mark him well;
For him no Minstrel raptures swell;
High though his titles, proud his name,
Boundless his wealth as wish can claim;
Despite those titles, power, and pelf,
The wretch, concentred all in self,
Living, shall forfeit fair renown,
And, doubly dying, shall go down
To the vile dust from whence he sprung,
Unwept, unhonour’d, and unsung.”

“As he offered to advance, she exclaimed, “Remain where thou art, proud Templar, or at thy choice advance!–one foot nearer, and I plunge myself from the precipice; my body shall be crushed out of the very form of humanity upon the stones of that courtyard ere it become the victim of thy brutality!”

“I will but confess the sins of my green cloak to my grey friar’s frock, and all shall be well again.”

“To all the sensual world proclaim, One crowded hour of glorious life, Is worth an age without a name.”

“Craigengelt, you are either an honest fellow in right good earnest, and I scarce know how to believe that; or you are cleverer than I took you for, and I scarce know how to believe that either.”

“When I reflect with what slow and limited supplies the stream of science hath hitherto descended to us, how difficult to be obtained by those most ardent in its search, how certain to be neglected by all who regard their ease; how liable to be diverted, altogether dried up, by the invasions of barbarism; can I look forward without wonder and astonishment to the lot of a succeeding generation on whom knowledge will descend like the first and second rain, uninterrupted, unabated, unbounded; fertilizing some grounds, and overflowing others; changing the whole form of social life; establishing and overthrowing religions; erecting and destroying kingdoms.”

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“Nothing perhaps increases by indulgence more than a desultory habit of reading, especially under such opportunities of gratifying it.”

“Thus do men throw on fate the issue of their own wild passions.”

“Rebecca! she who could prefer death to dishonor must have a proud and powerful soul!”

“The rose is fairest when ‘t is budding new,
And hope is brightest when it dawns from fears;
The rose is sweetest washed with morning dew
And love is loveliest when embalmed in tears.”

“He seems, in manner and rank, above the class of young men who take that turn; but I remember hearing them say, that the little theatre at Fairport was to open with the performance of a young gentleman, being his first appearance on any stage.—If this should be thee, Lovel!—Lovel? yes, Lovel or Belville are just the names which youngsters are apt to assume on such occasions—on my life, I am sorry for the lad.”

“Thou and I are but the blind instruments of some irresistible fatality, that hurries us along, like ships driving before the storm, which are dashed against each other, and so perish”

“Is death the last sleep? No, it is the last final awakening.”

“adversity bends the heart as fire bends the stubborn steel, and those who are no longer their own governors, and the denizens of their own free independent state, must crouch before strangers.”

“He that is without name,without friend,without coin,without country,is still at least a man;and he that has all these is no more”

“Thy resolution may fluctuate on the wild and changeful billows of human opinion, but mine is anchored on the Rock of Ages.”

“Female forms of exquisite grace and beauty began to mingle in his mental adventures; nor was he long without looking abroad to compare the creatures of his own imagination with the females of actual life.”

“Success or failure in business is caused more by the mental attitude even than by mental capacities.”

“Blessed be his name, who hath appointed the quiet night to follow the busy day, and the calm sleep to refresh the wearied limbs and to compose the troubled spirit.”

“Breathes there the man with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land.”

“My hope, my heaven, my trust must be,
My gentle guide, in following thee.”

“come he slow or come he fast it is but death that comes at last”

“I forgive you, Sir Knight,” said Rowena, “as a Christian.”

“That means,” said Wamba, “that she does not forgive him at all.”

“When true friends meet in adverse hour; ‘Tis like a sunbeam through a shower. A watery way an instant seen, The darkly closing clouds between.”

“A Christmas gambol oft could cheer
The poor man’s heart through half the year.”

“Once upon a time there lived an old woman, called Janet Gellatley, who was suspected to be a witch, on the infallible grounds that she was very old, very ugly, very poor, and had two sons, one of whom was a poet, and the other a fool, which visitation, all the neighbourhood agreed, had come upon her for the sin of witchcraft.”

“One or two of these scoundrel statesmen should be shot once a-year, just to keep the others on their good behavior.”

“In the wide pile, by others heeded not,
Hers was one sacred solitary spot,
Whose gloomy aisles and bending shelves contain
For moral hunger food, and cures for moral pain.”

“No word of commiseration can make a burden feel one feather’s weight lighter to the slave who must carry it.”

“Certainly,” quoth Athelstane, “women are the least to be trusted of all animals, monks and abbots excepted.”

“I have sought but a kindred spirit to share it, and I have found such in thee.”

“so wondrous wild, the whole might seem the scenery of a fairy dream”

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“There are few men who do not look back in secret to some period of their youth, at which a sincere and early affection was repulsed, or betrayed, or became abortive through opposing circumstances. It is these little passages of secret history, which leave a tinge of romance in every bosom, scarce permitting us, even in the most busy or advanced period of life, to listen with total indifference to a tale of true love.”

“The lovers of the chase say that the hare feels more agony during the pursuit of the greyhounds, than when she is struggling in their fangs.”

“He that climbs the tall tree has won right to the fruit, He that leaps the wide gulf should prevail in his suit.”

“Thou hast had thty day, old dame, but thy sun has long been set. Thou art now the very emblem of an old warhorse turned out on the barren heath; thou hast had thy paces in thy time, but now a broken amble is the best of them.”

“He that does good, having the unlimited power to do evil, deserves praise not only for the good which he performs, but for the evil which he forbears.”

“And please return it. You may think this a strange request, but I find that although my friends are poor arithmeticians, they are nearly all of them good bookkeepers.”

“And my father!-oh, my father! evil is it with his daughter, when his grey hairs are not remembered because of the golden locks of youth!”

“To all, to each, a fair good-night, And pleasing dreams, and slumbers light.”

“Perhaps the perusal of such works may, without injustice, be compared with the use of opiates, baneful, when habitually and constantly resorted to, but of most blessed power in those moments of pain and of langour, when the whole head is sore, and the whole heart sick. If those who rail indiscriminately at this species of composition, were to consider the quantity of actual pleasure it produces, and the much greater proportion of real sorrow and distress which it alleviates, their philanthropy ought to moderate their critical pride, or religious intolerance.”

“How nearly can what we most despise and hate, approach in outward manner to that which we most venerate!”

“Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life.”

“Look back, and smile on perils past!”
? Walter Scott, The Complete Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott
tags: inspirational, optimism, perils, smile 8 likes Like
“O, the tangled web we weave,
When first we practice to deceive.”

“The autumn winds rushing
Waft the leaves that are searest,
But our flower was in flushing,
When blighting was nearest.
Fleet foot on the correi,
Sage counsel in cumber,
Red hand in the foray,
How sound is thy slumber!
Like the dew on the mountain,
Like the foam on the river,
Like the bubble on the fountain,
Thou art gone, and for ever!”

“God will raise me up a champion.”

“A lawyer without history or literature is a mechanic, a mere working mason; if he possesses some knowledge of these, he may venture to call himself an architect.”

“A rusty nail placed near a faithful compass, will sway it from the truth, and wreck the argosy.”

“All men who have turned out worth anything have had the chief hand in their own education.”

“Cats are a mysterious kind of folk. There is more passing in their minds than we are aware of.”

“Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life.”

“Each age has deemed the new-born year the fittest time for festal cheer.”

“Faces that have charmed us the most escape us the soonest.”

“For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.”

“He is the best sailor who can steer within fewest points of the wind, and exact a motive power out of the greatest obstacles.”

“He that climbs the tall tree has won right to the fruit, He that leaps the wide gulf should prevail in his suit.”

“If a farmer fills his barn with grain, he gets mice. If he leaves it empty, he gets actors.”

“If you once turn on your side after the hour at which you ought to rise, it is all over. Bolt up at once.”

“It is wonderful what strength of purpose and boldness and energy of will are roused by the assurance that we are doing our duty.”

“Love rules the court, the camp, the grove, And men below, and saints above: For love is heaven, and heaven is love.”

“Many miles away there’s a shadow on the door of a cottage on the Shore of a dark Scottish lake.”

“O! many a shaft, at random sent, Finds mark the archer little meant! And many a word, at random spoken, May soothe or wound a heart that’s broken!”

“O, what a tangled web we weave when first we practise to deceive!”

“Of all vices, drinking is the most incompatible with greatness.”

“One crowded hour of glorious life is worth an age without a name”

“One hour of life, crowded to the full with glorious action, and filled with noble risks, is worth whole years of those mean observances of paltry decorum, in which men steal through existence, like sluggish waters through a marsh, without either honor or observation.”

“One of the most important phases of maturing is that of growth from self-centering to an understanding relationship to others. A person is not mature until he has both an ability and a willingness to see himself as one among others and to do unto those others as he would have them do to him.”

“Success – keeping your mind awake and your desire asleep.”

“Success or failure in business is caused more by the mental attitude even than by mental capacities.”

“Teach you children poetry; it opens the mind, lends grace to wisdom and makes the heroic virtues hereditary.”

“The half hour between waking and rising has all my life proved propitious to any task which was exercising my invention… It was always when I first opened my eyes that the desired ideas thronged upon me.”

“The race of mankind would perish did they cease to aid each other. We cannot exist without mutual help. All therefore that need aid have a right to ask it from their fellow-men; and no one who has the power of granting can refuse it without guilt.”

“There is a vulgar incredulity, which in historical matters, as well as in those of religion, finds it easier to doubt than to examine.”

“To all, to each, a fair good-night, and pleasing dreams, and slumbers light.”

“To be ambitious of true honor, of the true glory and perfection of our natures, is the very principle and incentive of virtue.”

“To every lovely lady bright, I wish a gallant faithful knight; To every faithful lover, too, I wish a trusting lady true.”

“To the timid and hesitating everything is impossible because it seems so.”

“Unless a tree has borne blossoms in spring, you will vainly look for fruit on it in autumn.”

“We build statues out of snow, and weep to see them melt.”

“We’re going to come back the exact same way we left off — as The Whispers. We do R&B music — lyric-conscious music that speaks to the adults. That’s what The Whispers are all about.”

“What I have to say is far more important than how long my eyelashes are.”

“What is a diary as a rule? A document useful to the person who keeps it. Dull to the contemporary who reads it and invaluable to the student, centuries afterwards, who treasures it.”

“When thinking about companions gone, we feel ourselves doubly alone.”

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