100+ Sylvia Earle Quotes that will Change our Views on Marine Life

0
679
Sylvia Earle Popular Quotes (4)

Sylvia Earle Quotes that will change our views on marine life. There are so many Sylvia Earle quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Sylvia Earle quotes exists just do that.

American Marine Biologist Sylvia Alice Earle DSc, was born on 30 August 1935 and is an explorer, author and lecturer. Since 1998 she has been the National Geographic explorer-in-residence. The United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s first female chief scientist was Earle. In 1998, Time Magazine named her the first Hero for the Planet. Ocean Elders, the group that protects the ocean and wildlife, Earle was a part of this group.

Born to Lewis Reade and Alice Freas (Richie) Earle on 1935 in Gibbstown, Gloucester County, New Jersey is Sylvia Anne Reade. Her parents were enthusiastic and supported Earle’s childhood interests in the natural world. During her childhood, they moved to the western coast of Florida. Earle got her associate degree in 1952 from St. Petersburg Junior College, and her Bachelor of Science degree in 1955 from Florida State University. She also received her Master of Science degree in 1956 from Duke University along with her Doctorate of Philosophy in the year 1966.

Early spent a year as a research fellow at Harvard after receiving her PhD in 1966. She then returned to Florida and was the resident director of the Cape Haze Marine Laboratory. She applied to join the Tektite Project in 1969. The project allowed scientists to study marine life for several weeks in an installation fifty feet below the surface of the sea. It was located on a cost of Virgin Islands. Earle has logged more than a thousand research hours undersea, unfortunately, she was rejected from the program.

In the Tektite II program in 1970, she was selected as the first all-female leader of the team of aquanauts. In 1979, near Oahu, Earle made an open ocean dive with JIM suit. As she set a record of 381 meters, setting a women’s depth record. In the same year, she joined the California Academy of Science as the Curator of Phycology until 1986. She served the National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere from 1980 to 1984.

Sylvia Earle has received numerous awards and honours including the TED prize, NOGI Award for science, has been knighted in the Order of Golden Ark by the Prince of Netherlands, Golden Plate Award, Society of Woman Geographers gold medal and much more.

We have dug up these Sylvia Earle quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Sylvia Earle Sayings in a single place. These famous Sylvia Earle quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Sylvia Earle quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Sylvia Earle quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences: –

“All through college, i had frequeently been the only girl in a science class-which wasn’t such a bad deal “

Sylvia Earle best Quotes

“I am naot in any hurry to grow up “

Sylvia Earle Famous Quotes

“No water,no life no blue ,no green .”

Sylvia Earle Popular Quotes (4)

“the single non- negotiable thigh life requires is water .”

Sylvia Earle Quotes

We have become frighteningly effective at altering nature

Sylvia Earle saying

“People ask: Why should I care about the ocean? Because the ocean is the cornerstone of earth’s life support system, it shapes climate and weather. It holds most of life on earth. 97% of earth’s water is there. It’s the blue heart of the planet — we should take care of our heart. It’s what makes life possible for us. We still have a really good chance to make things better than they are. They won’t get better unless we take the action and inspire others to do the same thing. No one is without power. Everybody has the capacity to do something.”

“Many of us ask what can I, as one person, do, but history shows us that everything good and bad starts because somebody does something or does not do something,”

“Even if you never have the chance to see or touch the ocean, the ocean touches you with every breath you take, every drop of water you drink, every bite you consume. Everyone, everywhere is inextricably connected to and utterly dependent upon the existence of the sea.”

“I can still feel that leap of enthusiasm, and real joy, at the prospect of finally getting out to the beach, and running around. But probably the most important thing, to me, aside from just the freedom of it and the power of it, was the kind of creatures that you could see along the beach, that you can’t find anywhere else.” – Sylvia Earle”

“The single non-negotiable thing life requires is water.”

“So, should we race to see how quickly we can consume the last tuna, swordfish, and grouper? Or race to see what can be done to protect what remains? For now, there is still a choice.”

“Our near and distant predecessors might be forgiven for exterminating the last woolly mammoth, the ultimate dodo, the final sea cow, and the last living monk seal for lack of understanding the consequences of their actions. But who will forgive us if we fail to learn from past and present experiences, to forge new values, new relationships, a new level of respect for the natural systems that keep us alive?”

“Knowing is the key to caring, and with caring there is hope that people will be motivated to take positive actions. They might not care even if they know, but they can’t care if they are unaware.”

“Currently, up to 20 percent of human greenhouse gas emissions are being caused by deforestation in tropical Brazil and Indonesia, making those countries two of the highest carbon emitters in the world. It is estimated that halting forest destruction would save the same amount of carbon over the next century as stopping all fossil-fuel emissions for ten years.”

“Let’s talk trash…. Only we humans make waste that nature can’t digest.”

“quoted Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson, once accused of being an “adventurer.” His response was, “An adventure is what happens when exploration goes wrong.”

“Even smaller pieces are engulfed by inch-long krill; ant-size copepods; and filter-feeding salps, clams, oysters, and mussels. Large plankton feeders such as whale sharks and manta rays swallow gallons of water at a time, plastic and all. Whether at the large, medium, small, or ultra-small scale, ingested plastic lumps, clumps, pellets, or microscopic mites kill by physically obstructing, choking, clogging, or otherwise stopping up the passage of food.”

“astrophysicist Christopher McKay puts it: “The single non-negotiable thing life requires is water.”

“Herrick fumed about this more than a century ago in his hefty tome on the American lobster: Civilized man is sweeping off the face of the earth one after another some of its most interesting and valuable animals, by a lack of foresight and selfish zeal…. If man had as ready access to the submarine fields as to the forests and plains, it is easy to imagine how much havoc he would spread. The ocean indeed seems to be as inexhaustible in its animal life as it is apparently limitless in extent and fathomless in depth, but we are apt to forget that marine animals may be as restricted in their distribution”

“One kind of blue-green bacteria, Prochlorococcus, is so abundant—about 100 octillion (1 octillion = 1027) are alive at any given moment—that it alone is responsible for about 20 percent of the oxygen in the atmosphere. Put another way, this nearly invisible form of life generates the oxygen in one of every five breaths you take, no matter where on the planet you live.”

“Thanks to generations of curious, daring, intrepid explorers of the past, we may know enough, soon enough, to chart safe passage for ourselves far into the future.”

“The bottom line answer to the question about why biodiversity matters is fairly simple: The rest of the living world can get along without us, but we can’t get along without them.”

“The various seafood guides usually rank farmed fish based on safety for consumers as well as on environmental impacts. Currently, it’s really hard to find out where or how animals were raised, what they have consumed that you don’t want to have as a part of you, or how long they have been sitting in storage, accumulating things you also do not want to have as a part of you. What most guides do not tell you is whether the fish are plant-eaters or carnivores, nor do you learn their likely age, and these things matter a lot for two reasons. The higher up the food chain, and the older the animal, the greater the concentration of contaminants: tuna, shark, swordfish, halibut, and in fact, most of the fish in the counter fit into this category. It takes a much greater investment from the ecosystem, pound for pound, to make a ten-year-old fish-eating tuna than a one-year-old plant-eating catfish. For those who want to eat low on the food chain with lowest risk of contaminants, farmed catfish, tilapia, carp, and certain mollusks are the best choices, but even so, it makes a difference where and how they were raised.”

“Even if you never have the chance to see or touch the ocean, the ocean touches you with every breath you take, every drop of water you drink, every bite you consume. Everyone, everywhere is inextricably connected to and utterly dependent upon the existence of the sea. Early”

“Species have been disappearing from ocean ecosystems and this trend has recently been accelerating…. If the long-term trend continues, all fish and seafood species are projected to collapse within my lifetime—by 2048.” But, he continued, “The good news is that it is not too late to turn things around.”

“A report from the National Academy of Sciences published five years later reported that over 6 billion kilograms (14 billion pounds) of garbage were deliberately dumped into the sea every year.”

“The problem is the magnitude of synthetic materials that are used briefly, then thrown away for eternity, thereby permanently changing the nature of the world.”

“But water alone does not generate oxygen, absorb carbon dioxide, or yield the simple sugars that are the basis of food production powering most of life on Earth. By itself, water does not produce the dimethyl sulfide molecules around which water gathers to form vapor that becomes clouds that in turn become rain, sleet, and snow. Microscopic photosynthetic organisms in the sea do all of these things and much more.”

“But there’s another, much darker, way in which Sylvia Earle helps us understand the size of the ocean. And that’s to point out that, vast as it is, it’s not so big that we can’t screw it up.”

“To succeed as a predator, simple math explains that it is vital that the consumers do not outnumber the consumees. The older and larger the consumer, the greater the investment of energy, pound for pound. It takes a lot of seeds and grass to make enough mice and rabbits to make a wolf; a lot of little plants to make sufficient numbers of small fish to make a shark. As it turns out, it takes a lot of everything to power human societies.”

“People ask: Why should I care about the ocean? Because the ocean is the cornerstone of earth’s life support system, it shapes climate and weather. It holds most of life on earth. 97% of earth’s water is there. It’s the blue heart of the planet-we should take care of our heart. It’s what makes life possible for us. We still have a really good chance to make things better than they are. They won’t get better unless we take the action and inspire others to do the same thing. No one is without power. Everybody has the capacity to do something.”

“It’s an appreciation for life generally, every bit of life, the smallest creature that lives in the intestines of termites that make termite life possible – to the leaves that turn out oxygen and grab carbon dioxide and with water make simple sugars that feed much of the world. I mean, these are everyday miracles.”

“The oceans deserve our respect and care, but you have to know something before you can care about it.”

“We want to think of ourselves as truly special creatures that are unique in the universe and, well, we are. And we have that capacity to wonder, to question, and to see ourselves in the context of all of life that has preceded the present time, and all that will go off far into the future, one way or another.”

“With every drop of water you drink, every breath you take, you’re connected to the sea. No matter where on Earth you live.”

“If Darwin could get into a submarine and see what I’ve seen, thousand of feet beneath the ocean, I am just confident that he would be inspired to sit down and start writing all over again.”

“Every time I slip into the ocean, it’s like going home.”

“When some people look at a shrimp they think, “Hmm. Delicious.” When I look at a shrimp I think, “You’re a miracle, absolutely incredible. Your ancestors have gone back hundreds of millions of years.” And to develop a thing as simple as a shrimp cocktail, you have to calculate the hundreds of millions of years that have preceded that moment where you’re sitting there with your sauce and fork poised.”

“No water, no life. No blue, no green.”

“Many of us ask what can I, as one person, do, but history shows us that everything good and bad starts because somebody does something or does not do something.”

“I suggest to everyone: Look in the mirror. Ask yourself: Who are you? What are your talents? Use them, and do what you love.”

“I want everybody to go jump in the ocean to see for themselves how beautiful it is, how important it is to get acquainted with fish swimming in the ocean, rather than just swimming with lemon slices and butter.”

“Scientists never stop asking. They’re little kids who never grew up.”

“It has taken these many hundreds of millions of years to fine-tune the Earth to a point where it is suitable for the likes of us.”

 

“We need to respect the oceans and take care of them as if our lives depended on it. Because they do.”

“Most of life on Earth has a deep past, much deeper than ours. And we have benefited from the distillation of all preceding history, call it evolutionary history if you will.”

“Far and away, the greatest threat to the ocean, and thus to ourselves, is ignorance. But we can do something about that.”

“If Darwin could see what we now see, what we now know about the ocean, about the atmosphere, about the nature of life, as we now understand it, about the importance of microbes – I think he would just beam with joy that many of the thoughts and the glimpses of the majesty of life on Earth that he had during his life, now magnified many times over.”

“Great attention gets paid to rainforests because of the diversity of life there. Diversity in the oceans is even greater.”

“The diversity of life on Earth, generally, is astonishing. But despite those large numbers, it’s also important to recognize that every species, one way or another, is vulnerable to extinction. And in our time on Earth our impact on the diversity of life has been profound.”

“I hope for your help to explore and protect the wild ocean in ways that will restore the health and, in so doing, secure hope for humankind. Health to the ocean means health for us.”

“Rather than be afraid of evolution and try to stifle inquiry, people should revel in the joys of knowing and find a serenity and a joy in being a part the rest of life on Earth. Not apart from it, but a part of it.”

“Ten percent of the big fish still remain. There are still some blue whales. There are still some krill in Antarctica. There are a few oysters in Chesapeake Bay. Half the coral reefs are still in pretty good shape, a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet. There’s still time, but not a lot, to turn things around.”

“The observations that have developed over the years have given us perspective about where we fit in. We are newcomers, really recent arrivals on a planet that is four and a half billion years old.”

“Sharks are beautiful animals, and if you’re lucky enough to see lots of them, that means that you’re in a healthy ocean. You should be afraid if you are in the ocean and don’t see sharks.”

“Evolution is not something to be feared. It’s to be celebrated, embraced, and understood.”

“Success underwater depends mostly on how you conduct yourself. Diving can be the most relaxing experience in the world. Your weight seems to disappear. Space travel will be available only to a few individuals for some time, but the oceans are available to almost everyone – now.”

“People I know who succeed don’t mind working. Those who are competent seem to like doing things well — not stopping because they haven’t accomplished what they wanted to on the first go-round. They’re willing to do it twenty times, if necessary. There’s an illusion that the good people can easily do something, and it’s not necessarily true. They’re just determined to do it right. I was impressed by hearing one of the women at Radcliffe talk about writing a poem, how many revisions a single poem sometimes has to go through — fifty or sixty revisions to come out with a poem sixteen lines long.”

“I have lots of heroes: anyone and everyone who does whatever they can to leave the natural world better than they found it.”

“We’ve got to somehow stabilize our connection to nature so that in 50 years from now, 500 years, 5,000 years from now there will still be a wild system and respect for what it takes to sustain us.”

“The image of Earth from space transformed our view of ourselves. It is maybe the most important image that exists – because we can see ourselves in context in a way that otherwise would be really hard to explain. It should inspire us to wonder about it, to want to know everything we can about it and do everything we can to take care of it.”

“Like a shipwreck or a jetty, almost anything that forms a structure in the ocean, whether it is natural or artificial over time, collects life.”

“This is a living planet. Look around. Mars, Venus, Jupiter. Look beyond our solar system. Where else is there a place that works, that is just right for the likes of us? It has not happened just instantly. It is vulnerable to our actions. But it’s the result of four and a half billion years of evolution, of change over time. And it changes every day, all the time. It would be in our interest to try to maintain a certain level of stability that has enabled us to prosper, to not wreck the very systems that give us life.”

“When I arrived on the planet, there were only two billion. Wildlife was more abundant, we were less so; now the situation is reversed.”

“Many of us ask what can I, as one person, do, but history shows us that everything good and bad starts because somebody does something or does not do something.”

“I suggest to everyone: Look in the mirror. Ask yourself: Who are you? What are your talents? Use them, and do what you love.”

“I want everybody to go jump in the ocean to see for themselves how beautiful it is, how important it is to get acquainted with fish swimming in the ocean, rather than just swimming with lemon slices and butter.”

“It has taken these many hundreds of millions of years to fine-tune the Earth to a point where it is suitable for the likes of us.”

“We need to respect the oceans and take care of them as if our lives depended on it. Because they do.”

“Most of life on Earth has a deep past, much deeper than ours. And we have benefited from the distillation of all preceding history, call it evolutionary history if you will.”

“Far and away, the greatest threat to the ocean, and thus to ourselves, is ignorance. But we can do something about that.”

“If Darwin could see what we now see, what we now know about the ocean, about the atmosphere, about the nature of life, as we now understand it, about the importance of microbes – I think he would just beam with joy that many of the thoughts and the glimpses of the majesty of life on Earth that he had during his life, now magnified many times over.”

“Great attention gets paid to rainforests because of the diversity of life there. Diversity in the oceans is even greater.”

“The diversity of life on Earth, generally, is astonishing. But despite those large numbers, it’s also important to recognize that every species, one way or another, is vulnerable to extinction. And in our time on Earth our impact on the diversity of life has been profound.”

“I hope for your help to explore and protect the wild ocean in ways that will restore the health and, in so doing, secure hope for humankind. Health to the ocean means health for us.”

“Rather than be afraid of evolution and try to stifle inquiry, people should revel in the joys of knowing and find a serenity and a joy in being a part the rest of life on Earth. Not apart from it, but a part of it.”

“Ten percent of the big fish still remain. There are still some blue whales. There are still some krill in Antarctica. There are a few oysters in Chesapeake Bay. Half the coral reefs are still in pretty good shape, a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet. There’s still time, but not a lot, to turn things around.”

“The observations that have developed over the years have given us perspective about where we fit in. We are newcomers, really recent arrivals on a planet that is four and a half billion years old.”

“Sharks are beautiful animals, and if you’re lucky enough to see lots of them, that means that you’re in a healthy ocean. You should be afraid if you are in the ocean and don’t see sharks.”

“Evolution is not something to be feared. It’s to be celebrated, embraced, and understood.”

“Success underwater depends mostly on how you conduct yourself. Diving can be the most relaxing experience in the world. Your weight seems to disappear. Space travel will be available only to a few individuals for some time, but the oceans are available to almost everyone – now.”

“People I know who succeed don’t mind working. Those who are competent seem to like doing things well — not stopping because they haven’t accomplished what they wanted to on the first go-round. They’re willing to do it twenty times, if necessary. There’s an illusion that the good people can easily do something, and it’s not necessarily true. They’re just determined to do it right. I was impressed by hearing one of the women at Radcliffe talk about writing a poem, how many revisions a single poem sometimes has to go through — fifty or sixty revisions to come out with a poem sixteen lines long.”

“I have lots of heroes: anyone and everyone who does whatever they can to leave the natural world better than they found it.”

“We’ve got to somehow stabilize our connection to nature so that in 50 years from now, 500 years, 5,000 years from now there will still be a wild system and respect for what it takes to sustain us.”

“The image of Earth from space transformed our view of ourselves. It is maybe the most important image that exists – because we can see ourselves in context in a way that otherwise would be really hard to explain. It should inspire us to wonder about it, to want to know everything we can about it and do everything we can to take care of it.”

“Like a shipwreck or a jetty, almost anything that forms a structure in the ocean, whether it is natural or artificial over time, collects life.”

“This is a living planet. Look around. Mars, Venus, Jupiter. Look beyond our solar system. Where else is there a place that works, that is just right for the likes of us? It has not happened just instantly. It is vulnerable to our actions. But it’s the result of four and a half billion years of evolution, of change over time. And it changes every day, all the time. It would be in our interest to try to maintain a certain level of stability that has enabled us to prosper, to not wreck the very systems that give us life.”

“When I arrived on the planet, there were only two billion. Wildlife was more abundant, we were less so; now the situation is reversed.”

“America gains most when individuals have great freedom to pursue personal goals without undue government interference.”

“As a child, I was aware of the widely-held attitude that the ocean is so big, so resilient that we could use the sea as the ultimate place to dispose of anything we did not want, from garbage and nuclear wastes to sludge from sewage to entire ships that had reached the end of their useful life.”

“Bottom trawling is a ghastly process that brings untold damage to sea beds that support ocean life. It’s akin to using a bulldozer to catch a butterfly, destroying a whole ecosystem for the sake of a few pounds of protein. We wouldn’t do this on land, so why do it in the oceans?”

“By the end of the 20th century, up to 90 percent of the sharks, tuna, swordfish, marlins, groupers, turtles, whales, and many other large creatures that prospered in the Gulf for millions of years had been depleted by overfishing.”

“Earth as an ecosystem stands out in the all of the universe. There’s no place that we know about that can support life as we know it, not even our sister planet, Mars, where we might set up housekeeping someday, but at great effort and trouble we have to recreate the things we take for granted here.”

“Every time I slip into the ocean, it’s like going home.”

“Everyone has power. But it doesn’t help if you don’t use it.”

“For humans, the Arctic is a harshly inhospitable place, but the conditions there are precisely what polar bears require to survive – and thrive. ‘Harsh’ to us is ‘home’ for them. Take away the ice and snow, increase the temperature by even a little, and the realm that makes their lives possible literally melts away.”

“Forty percent of the United States drains into the Mississippi. It’s agriculture. It’s golf courses. It’s domestic runoff from our lawns and roads. Ultimately, where does it go? Downstream into the gulf.”

“‘Green’ issues at last are attracting serious attention, owing to critically important links between the environment and the economy, health, and our security.”

“Health to the ocean means health for us.”

“Hold up a mirror and ask yourself what you are capable of doing, and what you really care about. Then take the initiative – don’t wait for someone else to ask you to act.”

“Humans are the only creatures with the ability to dive deep in the sea, fly high in the sky, send instant messages around the globe, reflect on the past, assess the present and imagine the future.”

“I actually love diving at night; you see a lot of fish then that you don’t see in the daytime.”

“I find the lure of the unknown irresistible.”

“I have lots of heroes: anyone and everyone who does whatever they can to leave the natural world better than they found it.”

“I hope for your help to explore and protect the wild ocean in ways that will restore the health and, in so doing, secure hope for humankind. Health to the ocean means health for us.”

“I love music of all kinds, but there’s no greater music than the sound of my grandchildren laughing; my kids, too.”

“I love my Force Fins, which are the kind of fins Special Forces use and really are adapted from the fins of fish. They’re very efficient. They are so beautiful, a pair is in the Museum of Modern Art. The set I have are ruby red. I call them my ruby flippers.”

“I would love to slip into the skin of a fish and know what it’s like to be one. They have senses that I can only dream about. They have a lateral line down their whole body that senses motion, but maybe it does more than that.”

“Ice ages have come and gone. Coral reefs have persisted.”

“If you think the ocean isn’t important, imagine Earth without it. Mars comes to mind. No ocean, no life support system.”

“I’m not against extracting a modest amount of wildlife out of the ocean for human consumption, but I am really concerned about the large-scale industrial fishing that engages in destructive practices like trawling and longlining.”

“In terms of personal choices, let’s all think more carefully about where we get our protein from.”

“I’ve always said, ‘Underwater or on top, men and women are compatible.'”

“I’ve had the joy of spending thousands of hours under the sea. I wish I could take people along to see what I see, and to know what I know.”

“Just as we have the power to harm the ocean, we have the power to put in place policies and modify our own behavior in ways that would be an insurance policy for the future of the sea, for the creatures there, and for us, protecting special critical areas in the ocean.”

“Like a shipwreck or a jetty, almost anything that forms a structure in the ocean, whether it is natural or artificial over time, collects life.”

“Look at the bark of a redwood, and you see moss. If you peer beneath the bits and pieces of the moss, you’ll see toads, small insects, a whole host of life that prospers in that miniature environment. A lumberman will look at a forest and see so many board feet of lumber. I see a living city.”

“My first encounter with the ocean was on the Jersey Shore when I was three years old and I got knocked over by a wave. The ocean certainly got my attention! It wasn’t frightening, it was more exhilarating.”

“My mother was known as the ‘bird lady’ of the neighborhood. Anything injured, or any unusual creature somebody found, they would always come to our doorstep.”

“No water, no life. No blue, no green.”

“Ocean acidification – the excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that is turning the oceans increasingly acid – is a slow but accelerating impact with consequences that will greatly overshadow all the oil spills put together. The warming trend that is CO2-related will overshadow all the oil spills that have ever occurred put together.”

“On a sea floor that looks like a sandy mud bottom, that at first glance might appear to be sand and mud, when you look closely and sit there as I do for a while and just wait, all sorts of creatures show themselves, with little heads popping out of the sand. It is a metropolis.”

“Photosynthetic organisms in the sea yield most of the oxygen in the atmosphere, take up and store vast amounts of carbon dioxide, shape planetary chemistry, and hold the planet steady.”

“Places change over time with or without oil spills, but humans are responsible for the Deepwater Horizon gusher – and humans, as well as the corals, fish and other creatures, are suffering the consequences.”

“Sharks are beautiful animals, and if you’re lucky enough to see lots of them, that means that you’re in a healthy ocean. You should be afraid if you are in the ocean and don’t see sharks.”

“Some experts look at global warming, increased world temperature, as the critical tipping point that is causing a crash in coral reef health around the world. And there’s no question that it is a factor, but it’s preceded by the loss of resilience and degradation.”

“Ten percent of the big fish still remain. There are still some blue whales. There are still some krill in Antarctica. There are a few oysters in Chesapeake Bay. Half the coral reefs are still in pretty good shape, a jeweled belt around the middle of the planet. There’s still time, but not a lot, to turn things around.”

“The Arctic is an ocean. The southern pole is a continent surrounded by ocean. The North Pole is an ocean, or northern waters. It’s an ocean surrounded by land, basically.”

“The best scientists and explorers have the attributes of kids! They ask question and have a sense of wonder. They have curiosity. ‘Who, what, where, why, when, and how!’ They never stop asking questions, and I never stop asking questions, just like a five year old.”

“The Exxon Valdez spill triggered a swift and strong response that changed policies about shipping, about double-hulled construction. A number of laws came into place.”

“The most important thing for people to know about the governance of the Arctic is that we have a chance now to act to maintain the integrity of the system or to lose it. To lose it means that we will dismember the vital systems that make the Arctic work. It’s not just a cost to the people who live there. It’s a cost to all people everywhere.”

“There’s something missing about how we’re informing the youngsters coming along about what matters in the world. We teach them the numbers and the letters, but we fail to communicate the importance of our connection to the living world.”

“We have been far too aggressive about extracting ocean wildlife, not appreciating that there are limits and even points of no return.”

“We need to respect the oceans and take care of them as if our lives depended on it. Because they do.”

“When I arrived on the planet, there were only two billion. Wildlife was more abundant, we were less so; now the situation is reversed.”

“When I write a scientific treatise, I might reach 100 people. When the ‘National Geographic’ covers a project, it communicates about plants and fish and underwater technology to more than 10 million people.”

“Why is it that scuba divers and surfers are some of the strongest advocates of ocean conservation? Because they’ve spent time in and around the ocean, and they’ve personally seen the beauty, the fragility, and even the degradation of our planet’s blue heart.”

“With every drop of water you drink, every breath you take, you’re connected to the sea. No matter where on Earth you live.”

“All through college, I had frequently been the only girl in a science class – which wasn’t such a bad deal.”

“Any astronaut can tell you you’ve got to do everything you can to learn about your life support system and then do everything you can to take care of it.”

“Every fish fertilizes the water in a way that generates the plankton that ultimately leads back into the food chain, but also yields oxygen, grabs carbon – it’s a part of what makes the ocean function and what makes the planet function.”

“Evolution is not something to be feared. It’s to be celebrated, embraced, and understood.”

“For heaven’s sake, when you see the enemy attacking, you pick up the pitchfork, and you enlist everybody you see. You don’t stand around arguing about who’s responsible, or who’s going to pay.”

“Humans have always wondered the big questions, “Who am I? Where have I come from? Where am I going?” It’s part of human nature. It’s perhaps the underpinnings of religion.”

“I am not in any hurry to grow up.”

“I have come up at the end of a dive, and the boat was not where I left it. I had to take care of a buddy who did panic. But I was confident the boat would come back.”

“I have heard endlessly that fish are so resilient that there is no way that you could exterminate a species. We are learning otherwise.”

“I want everybody to go jump in the ocean to see for themselves how beautiful it is, how important it is to get acquainted with fish swimming in the ocean, rather than just swimming with lemon slices and butter.”

“If Darwin could see what we now see, what we now know about the ocean, about the atmosphere, about the nature of life, as we now understand it, about the importance of microbes – I think he would just beam with joy that many of the thoughts and the glimpses of the majesty of life on Earth that he had during his life, now magnified many times over.”

“If somebody dumps something noxious in my back yard, the dumper is the last one I would call on to repair the damage.”

“If we could magically transport ourselves back to the young Earth, when it was only a billion years old or two billion years old or three billion years old or four billion years old, we wouldn’t be able to survive. We would have a hard time surviving if we were transported to the time when dinosaurs were around.”

“I’m friends with James Cameron. We’ve spent time together over the years because he is a diver and explorer and in his heart of hearts a biologist. We run into each other at scientific conferences.”

“It has taken these many hundreds of millions of years to fine-tune the Earth to a point where it is suitable for the likes of us.”

“It is the worst of times but it is the best of times because we still have a chance.”

“It’s a fact of life that there will be oil spills, as long as oil is moved from place to place, but we must have provisions to deal with them, and a capability that is commensurate with the size of the oil shipments.”

“It’s mainly the high-end luxury market now that drives much of the fishing in the sea. It’s not feeding the starving millions. It’s feeding a luxury market.”

“Large areas of the Gulf have escaped being scraped by trawls, crushed by more than 40,000 miles of pipelines, or displaced by one of 50,000 oil and gas wells drilled since the middle of the 20th century. Some places have been deliberately protected.”

“Meat reared on land matures relatively quickly, and it takes only a few pounds of plants to produce a pound of meat.”

“Most of life on Earth has a deep past, much deeper than ours. And we have benefited from the distillation of all preceding history, call it evolutionary history if you will.”

“My parents moved to Florida when I was 12, and my backyard was the Gulf of Mexico.”

“Nearly all of the major kinds of life, divisions of life, phyla of animals, occur in the sea. Only about half of them can make it to land or freshwater.”

“Nothing has prepared sharks, squid, krill and other sea creatures for industrial-scale extraction that destroys entire ecosystems while targeting a few species.”

“Our insatiable appetite for fossil fuels and the corporate mandate to maximize shareholder value encourages drilling without taking into account the costs to the ocean, even without major spills.”

“People still do not understand that a live fish is more valuable than a dead one, and that destructive fishing techniques are taking a wrecking ball to biodiversity.”

“Protecting vital sources of renewal – unscathed marshes, healthy reefs, and deep-sea gardens – will provide hope for the future of the Gulf, and for all of us.”

“Santa Monica Bay is less polluted today than when I first moved to the area in the 1970s, because actions have been taken to avoid putting some of the noxious materials into the sea. I think people are more aware than they once were, the air is cleaner, water generally is, in spite of the fact that there are more people.”

“Since the middle of the 20th century, more has been learnt about the ocean than during all preceding human history; at the same time, more has been lost.”

“The Arctic is a place that historically, during all preceding human history, has largely been an icy realm with an impact on ocean currents. That, in turn, influences the temperature of the planet. The Arctic is now vulnerable because of the excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, with a rate of melting that is stunning.”

“The climate has been changing. Of course it [has]. Evidence throughout history, [which] we can assess, especially during human history, shows there have been ups and downs. But the last ten thousand years have been relatively stable compared to now.”

“The concept of ‘peak oil’ has penetrated the hearts and minds of people concerned about energy for the future. ‘Peak fish’ occurred around the end of the 1980s.”

“The diversity of life on Earth, generally, is astonishing. But despite those large numbers, it’s also important to recognize that every species, one way or another, is vulnerable to extinction. And in our time on Earth our impact on the diversity of life has been profound.”

“The end of commercial fishing is predicted long before the middle of the 21st century.”

“The sudden release of five million barrels of oil, enormous quantities of methane and two million gallons of toxic dispersants into an already greatly stressed Gulf of Mexico will permanently alter the nature of the area.”

“The very energy sources that have gotten us to where we are now are also, if we continue doing what we’re doing, a shortcut to the end of all that we hold near and dear.”

“There are some who would like to see the oil rigs removed right down to the ground once their job is done, and there are others, and I count myself among them, who think that once they are in place they begin to be adopted by life in the ocean as a habitat.”

“There is a terribly terrestrial mindset about what we need to do to take care of the planet-as if the ocean somehow doesn’t matter or is so big, so vast that it can take care of itself, or that there is nothing that we could possibly do that we could harm the ocean…We are learning otherwise.”

“There is not a well-funded campaign among scientists to say, “Look, here’s the evidence. You can read it yourself. Here are the facts. We’re not making this up.””

“There’s a vested interest in trying to keep people smoking cigarettes.”

“We all have to take responsibility for the direction we are going. In our schools we are focusing on numbers and letters but we need, from the earliest times, to get across the concept that we are connected to nature and that we are trying to find a space to sustain ourselves.”

“We have become frighteningly effective at altering nature.”

“We have taken the manatees out of the areas in the Caribbean and really elsewhere in the world, and this disruption to the system makes such systems vulnerable to changes as they come by, whether it’s in terms of disease or terms or global warming for that matter.”

“We might set up house on Mars but … we do very little exploring the blue part of the planet. We have done so much skyward, I would like to see us spend more money and effort to explore below us.”

“We’ve got to somehow stabilize our connection to nature so that 50 years from now, 500 years, 5,000 years from now there will still be a wild system and respect for what it takes to sustain us,”

“What we once used as weapons of war, we now use as weapons against fish.”

“When I first ventured into the Gulf of Mexico in the 1950s, the sea appeared to be a blue infinity too large, too wild to be harmed by anything that people could do.”

“When some people look at a shrimp they think, “Hmm. Delicious.” When I look at a shrimp I think, “You’re a miracle, absolutely incredible. Your ancestors have gone back hundreds of millions of years.” And to develop a thing as simple as a shrimp cocktail, you have to calculate the hundreds of millions of years that have preceded that moment where you’re sitting there with your sauce and fork poised.”

“When you think about the real cost of so-called cheap energy that has driven our prosperity to unprecedented levels, for some of us, to our horror, we’ve realized that this has the potential for burning brightly and then snuffing out.”

“You have to love it before you are moved to save it.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.