110+ Rene Descartes Quotes Tells Us About The French Scientist

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Rene Descartes best quotes

These Rene Descartes quotes tells us about the French scientist. There are so many Rene Descartes quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Rene Descartes quotes exists just do that.

Scholar René Descartes alias Rene Descartes was conceived on March 31st in the year 1596. Rene Descartes was born in La Haye en Touraine, a community in focal France, which has since been renamed after him to respect its most popular child. Rene Descartes was the most youthful of three kids, and his mom, Jeanne Brochard, passed on inside his first year of life. Rene Descartes’ dad, Joachim, a board part in the common parliament, sent the youngsters to live with their maternal grandmother, where they stayed even after he remarried a couple of years after the fact. Be that as it may, Rene Descartes was worried about great training and sent René, at age 8, to live-in school at the Jesuit school of Henri IV in La Flèche, a few miles toward the north, for a long time. Rene Descartes was a decent understudy, despite the fact that it is believed that he may have been debilitated since he didn’t need to comply with the school thorough timetable and was rather permitted to rest in bed until midmorning.

The subjects Rene Descartes considered, for example, talk and rationale and the “scientific expressions,” which included music and cosmology, just as mysticism, a characteristic way of thinking and morals, prepared him well for his future as a logician. So did going through the following four years procuring a baccalaureate in law at the University of Poitiers. Rene Descartes later added religious philosophy and drug to his examinations. Be that as it may, Rene Descartes shunned such a lot of, “making plans to look for no information other than that of which could be found in myself or else in the extraordinary book of the world,” Rene Descartes composed a lot later in Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting the Reason and Seeking Truth in the Sciences, distributed in the year 1637. Rene Descartes voyaged, joined the military for a short time, saw a few fights and was acquainted with Dutch researcher and logician Isaac Beeckman, who might progress toward becoming for Rene Descartes an extremely compelling instructor. A year in the wake of moving on from Poitiers, Rene Descartes credited a progression of three ground-breaking dreams or dreams with deciding the course of his investigation for an incredible reminder.

We have dug up these Rene Descartes quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Rene Descartes Sayings in a single place. These famous Rene Descartes quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Rene Descartes quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Rene Descartes quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences: –

“The reading of all good books is like conversation with the finest men of past centuries.”

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“Conquer yourself rather than the world.”

Rene Descartes quotes

“It is not enough to have a good mind; the main thing is to use it well.”

Rene Descartes popular quotes

“But in my opinion, all things in nature occur mathematically.”

Rene Descartes famous quotes

“There is nothing more ancient than the truth.”

Rene Descartes saying

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“I think; therefore I am.”

“If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.”

“I suppose therefore that all things I see are illusions; I believe that nothing has ever existed of everything my lying memory tells me. I think I have no senses. I believe that body, shape, extension, motion, location are functions. What is there then that can be taken as true? Perhaps only this one thing, that nothing at all is certain.”

“Common sense is the most widely shared commodity in the world, for every man is convinced that he is well supplied with it.”

“Doubt is the origin of wisdom”

“Except our own thoughts, there is nothing absolutely in our power.”

“And thus, the actions of life often not allowing any delay, it is a truth very certain that, when it is not in our power to determine the most true opinions we ought to follow the most probable.”

“To know what people really think, pay attention to what they do, rather than what they say.”

“The greatest minds are capable of the greatest vices as well as of the greatest virtues.”

“I desire to live in peace and to continue the life I have begun under the motto ‘to live well you must live unseen”

“Masked, I advance.”

“It is only prudent never to place complete confidence in that by which we have even once been deceived.”

“To live without philosophizing is in truth the same as keeping the eyes closed without attempting to open them.”

“In order to seek truth, it is necessary once in the course of our life to doubt, as far as possible, of all things.”

“You just keep pushing. You just keep pushing. I made every mistake that could be made. But I just kept pushing.”

“In order to improve the mind, we ought less to learn than to contemplate.”

“For I found myself embarrassed with so many doubts and errors that it seemed to me that the effort to instruct myself had no effect other than the increasing discovery of my own ignorance”

“He who hid well, lived well.”

“Each problem that I solved became a rule which served afterwards to solve other problems”

“Divide each difficulty into as many parts as is feasible and necessary to resolve it.”

“At last I will devote myself sincerely and without reservation to the general demolition of my opinions.”

“…it is a mark of prudence never to place our complete trust in those who have deceived us even once.”

“Because reason…is the only thing that makes us men, and distinguishes us from the beasts, I would prefer to believe that it exists, in its entirety, in each of us…”

“And what more am I? I look for aid to the imagination. [But how mistakenly!] I am not that assemblage of limbs we call the human body; I am not a subtle penetrating air distributed throughout all these members; I am not a wind, a fire, a vapor, a breath or anything at all that I can image. I am supposing all these things to be nothing. Yet I find, while so doing, that I am still assured that I am a something.”

“Of all things, good sense is the most fairly distributed: everyone thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those who are the hardest to satisfy in every other respect never desire more of it than they already have.”

“By ‘God’, I understand, a substance which is infinite, independent, supremely intelligent, supremely powerful, and which created both myself and everything else […] that exists. All these attributes are such that, the more carefully I concentrate on them, the less possible it seems that they could have originated from me alone. So, from what has been said it must be concluded that God necessarily exists”

“This result could have been achieved either by his [God] endowing my intellect with a clear and distinct perception of everything about which I would ever deliberate, or simply by impressing the following rule so firmly upon my memory that I could never forget it: I should never judge anything that I do not clearly and distinctly understand.”

“Whence then come my errors? They come from the sole fact that since the will is much wider in its range and compass than the understanding, I do not restrain it within the same bounds, but extend it also to things which I do not understand: and as the will is of itself indifferent to these, it easily falls into error and sin, and chooses the evil for the good, or the false for the true.”

“For the very fact that my knowledge is increasing little by little is the most certain argument for its imperfection.”

“No hay nada repartido de modo más equitativo en el mundo que la razón: todo el mundo está convencido de tener suficiente.”

“The first precept was never to accept a thing as true until I knew it as such without a single doubt.”

“Common sense is the best distributed commodity in the world, for every man is convinced that he is well supplied with it.”

“although we very clearly see the sun, we ought not therefore to determine that it is only of the size which our sense of sight presents; and we may very distinctly imagine the head of a lion joined to the body of a goat, without being therefore shut up to the conclusion that a chimaera exists; for it is not a dictate of reason that what we thus see or imagine is in reality existent; but it plainly tells us that all our ideas or notions contain in them some truth.”

“The dreams we imagine when we are asleep should not in any way make us doubt the truth of the thoughts we have when we are awake.”

“One should never judge anything unless it is known.”

“They do everything in their power to make fortune favor them in this life, but nevertheless they think so little of it, in relation to eternity, that they view the events of the world as we do those of a play.”

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“I suppose therefore that all things I see are illusions; I believe that nothing has ever existed of everything my lying memory tells me. I think I have no senses. I believe that body, shape, extension, motion, location are functions. What is there then that can be taken as true? Perhaps only this one thing, that nothing at all is certain … But I cannot forget that, at other times I have been deceived in sleep by similar illusions; and, attentively considering those cases, I perceive so clearly that there exist no certain marks by which the state of waking can ever be distinguished from sleep, that I feel greatly astonished; and in amazement I almost persuade myself that I am now dreaming … I am accustomed to sleep and in my dreams to imagine the same things that lunatics imagine when awake … There is nothing more ancient than the truth.”

“My third maxim was to try always to master myself rather than fortune and change my desires rather than changing how things stand in the world.”

“Il buon senso è la cosa meglio distribuita al mondo. Ciascuno infatti pensa di esserne così ben provvisto che anche coloro che di tutte le altre cose non si contentano mai, di questa sono soliti non volerne più di quanto ne hanno.”

“…reading good books is like engaging in conversation with the most cultivated minds of past centuries who had composed them, or rather, taking part in a well-conducted dialogue in which such minds reveal to us only the best of their thoughts”

“And, in fine, of false sciences I thought I knew the worth sufficiently to escape being deceived by the professions of an alchemist, the predictions of an astrologer, the impostures of a magician, or by the artifices and boasting of any of those who profess to know things of which they are ignorant.”

“It is thus quite certain that the constitution of the true religion, the ordinances of which are derived from God, must be incomparably superior to that of every other.”

“I am in doubt as to the propriety of making my first meditations in the place above mentioned matter of discourse; for these are so metaphysical, and so uncommon, as not, perhaps, to be acceptable to every one. And yet, that it may be determined whether the foundations that I have laid are sufficiently secure, I find myself in a measure constrained to advert to them. I had long before remarked that, in relation to practice, it is sometimes necessary to adopt, as if above doubt, opinions which we discern to be highly uncertain, as has been already said; but as I then desired to give my attention solely to the search after truth, I thought that a procedure exactly the opposite was called for, and that I ought to reject as absolutely false all opinions in regard to which I could suppose the least ground for doubt, in order to ascertain whether after that there remained aught in my belief that was wholly indubitable. Accordingly, seeing that our senses sometimes deceive us, I was willing to suppose that there existed nothing really such as they presented to us; and because some men err in reasoning, and fall into paralogisms, even on the simplest matters of geometry, I, convinced that I was as open to error as any other, rejected as false all the reasonings I had hitherto taken for demonstrations; and finally, when I considered that the very same thoughts (presentations) which we experience when awake may also be experienced when we are asleep, while there is at that time not one of them true, I supposed that all the objects (presentations) that had ever entered into my mind when awake, had in them no more truth than the illusions of my dreams. But immediately upon this I observed that, whilst I thus wished to think that all was false, it was absolutely necessary that I, who thus thought, should be somewhat; and as I observed that this truth, I think, therefore I am [“cogito ergo sum”], was so certain and of such evidence that no ground of doubt, however extravagant, could be alleged by the sceptics capable of shaking it, I concluded that I might, without scruple, accept it as the first principle of the philosophy of which I was in search”

“The reading of all good books is like a conversation with the finest minds of past centuries.”

“Suppose [a person] had a basket full of apples and, being worried that some of the apples were rotten, wanted to take out the rotten ones to prevent the rot spreading. How would he proceed? Would he not begin by tipping the whole lot out of the basket? And would not the next step be to cast his eye over each apple in turn, and pick up and put back in the basket only those he saw to be sound, leaving the others? In just the same way, those who have never philosophized correctly have various opinions in their minds which they have begun to store up since childhood, and which they therefore have reason to believe may in many cases be false. They then attempt to separate the false beliefs from the others, so as to prevent their contaminating the rest and making the whole lot uncertain. Now the best way they can accomplish this is to reject all their beliefs together in one go, as if they were all uncertain and false. They can then go over each belief in turn and re-adopt only those which they recognize to be true and indubitable.”

“I had become aware, as early as my college days, that no opinion, however absurd and incredible can be imagined, that has not been held by one of the philosophers.”

“I fear being shaken out of them because I am afraid that my peaceful sleep may be followed by hard labour when I wake, and that I shall have to struggle not in the light but in the imprisoning darkness of the problems I have raised.”

“. . .it is not my design to teach the method that everyone must follow in order to use his reason properly, but only to show the way in which I have tried to use my own.”

“Am I so tied to a body and senses that I am incapable of existing without them?”

“The last rule was to make enumerations so complete, and reviews so comprehensive, that I should be certain of omitting nothing.”

“Just as faith teaches us that the sovereign felicity of the other life consists in the contemplation of the divine majesty alone, so even now we can learn from experience that a similar meditation, although incomparably less perfect, allows us to enjoy the greatest happiness we are capable of feeling in this life.”

“With me, everything turns into mathematics.”

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“Let whoever can do so deceive me, he will never bring it about that I am nothing, so long as I continue to think I am something.”

“Dubium sapientiae initium. (Doubt is the origin of wisdom.)”

“Good sense is the most equitably distributed of all things because no matter how much or little a person has, everyone feels so abundantly provided with good sense that he feels no desire for more than he already possesses.”

“But I cannot forget that, at other times I have been deceived in sleep by similar illusions; and, attentively considering those cases, I perceive so clearly that there exist no certain marks by which the state of waking can ever be distinguished from sleep, that I feel greatly astonished; and in amazement I almost persuade myself that I am now dreaming.”

“Some years ago I was struck by the large number of falsehoods that I had accepted as true in my childhood, and by the highly doubtful nature of the whole edifice that I had subsequently based on them. I realized that it was necessary, once in the course of my life, to demolish everything completely and start again right from the foundations if I wanted to establish anything at all in the sciences that was stable and likely to last.”

“The reading of all good books is indeed like a conversation with the noblest men of past centuries who were the authors of them, nay a carefully studied conversation, in which they reveal to us none but the best of their thoughts.”

“I doubt, therefore I think, therefore I am.”

“It is not enough to have a good mind. The main thing is to use it well.”

“So blind is the curiosity by which mortals are possessed, that they often conduct their minds along unexplored routes, having no reason to hope for success, but merely being willing to risk the experiment of finding whether the truth they seek lies there.”

“Bad books engender bad habits, but bad habits engender good books.”

“I am accustomed to sleep and in my dreams to imagine the same things that lunatics imagine when awake.”

“It is best not to go on for great quest for truth , it will only make you miserable”

“But what then am I? A thing that thinks. What is that? A thing that doubts, understand, affirms, denies, wills, refuses, and that also imagines and senses.”

“Whatever I have up till now accepted as most true and assured I have gotten either from the senses or through the senses. But from time to time I have found that the senses deceive, and it is prudent never to trust completely those who have deceived us even once.”

“[…] the diversity of our opinions, consequently, does not arise from some being endowed with a larger share of reason than others, but solely from this, that we conduct our thoughts along different ways, and do not fix our attention on the same objects. For to be possessed of a vigorous mind is not enough; the prime requisite is rightly to apply it. The greatest minds, as they are capable of the highest excellences, are open likewise to the greatest aberrations; and those who travel very slowly may yet make far greater progress, provided they keep always to the straight road, than those who, while they run, forsake it.”

“I am thing that thinks: that is, a things that doubts,affirms, denies, understands a few things, is ignorant of many things, is willing, is unwilling, and also which imagines and has sensory perceptions.”

“Nothing is more fairly distributed than common sense: no one thinks he needs more of it than he already has.”

“I knew that the languages which one learns there are necessary to understand the works of the ancients; and that the delicacy of fiction enlivens the mind; that famous deeds of history ennoble it and, if read with understanding, aid in maturing one’s judgment; that the reading of all the great books is like conversing with the best people of earlier times; it is even studied conversation in which the authors show us only the best of their thoughts; that eloquence has incomparable powers and beauties; that poetry has enchanting delicacy and sweetness; that mathematics has very subtle processes which can serve as much to satisfy the inquiring mind as to aid all the arts and diminish man’s labor; that treatises on morals contain very useful teachings and exhortations to virtue; that theology teaches us how to go to heaven; that philosophy teaches us to talk with appearance of truth about things, and to make ourselves admired by the less learned; that law, medicine, and the other sciences bring honors and wealth to those who pursue them; and finally, that it is desirable to have examined all of them, even to the most superstitious and false in order to recognize their real worth and avoid being deceived thereby”

“When I turn my mind’s eye upon myself, I understand that I am a thing which is incomplete and dependent on another and which aspires without limit to ever greater and better things…”

“My third maxim was to endeavor always to conquer myself rather than fortune, and change my desires rather than the order of the world, and in general, accustom myself to the persuasion that, except our own thoughts, there is nothing absolutely in our power; so that when we have done our best in things external to us, all wherein we fail of success is to be held, as regards us, absolutely impossible: and this single principle seemed to me sufficient to prevent me from desiring for the future anything which I could not obtain, and thus render me contented”

“La lecture de tous les bons livres est comme une conversation avec les plus honnêtes gens des siècles passés.”

“Dubium sapientiae initium (Doubt is the origin of wisdom).”

“The destruction of the foundations necessarily brings down the whole edifice.”

“Each problem that I solved became a rule, which served afterwards to solve other problems.”

“I think therefore I am”

“Good sense is, of all things among men, the most equally distributed; for every one thinks himself so abundantly provided with it, that those even who are the most difficult to satisfy in everything else, do not usually desire a larger measure of this quality than they already possess.”

“For to be possessed of a vigorous mind is not enough; the prime requisite is rightly to apply it. The greatest minds, as they are capable of the highest excellence, are open likewise to the greatest aberrations; and those who travel very slowly may yet make far greater progress, provided they keep always to the straight road, than those who, while they run, forsake it.”

“Whenever enyone has offended me, I try to raise my soul so high that the offense cannot reach it.”

“Reading good books is like engaging in conversation with the most cultivated minds of past centuries who had composed them, or rather, taking part in a well-conducted dialogue in which such minds reveal to us only the best of their thoughts.”

“I am like a prisoner who happens on enjoy an imaginary freedom in his dreams and who subsequently begins to suspect that he is asleep and, afraid of being awakened, conspires silently with his agreeable illusions.”

“Je pense, donc je suis; English: I think, therefore I am)”

“The thinking of the mind is twofold: understanding and willing.”

“The will determines itself; it should not be described as blind, any more than vision should be described as deaf.”

“Those who reason most powerfully and are the most successful at ordering their thoughts so as to make them clear and intelligible will always be best able to persuade others of what they say, even if they speak in the thickest of dialects”

“I am not a collection of members which we call the human body: I am not a subtle air distributed through these members, I am not a wind, a fire, a vapour, a breath, nor anything at all which I can imagine or conceive; because I have assumed that all these were nothing. Without changing that supposition I find that I only leave myself certain of the fact that I am somewhat.”

“It is useful to know something of the manners of different nations, that we may be enabled to form a more correct judgment regarding our own, and be prevented from thinking that everything contrary to our customs is ridiculous and irrational, a conclusion usually come to by those whose experience has been limited to their own country.”

“For to be possessed of a vigorous mind is not enough; the prime requisite is rightly to apply it.”

“Good sense is of all things in the world the most equally distributed, for everybody thinks he is so well supplied with it that even those most difficult to please in all other matters never desire more of it than they already possess.”

“[I]t seems to be just as foolish to say, ‘I imagine, in order to understand more clearly what I am,’ as to say, ‘I am now clearly awake and I see something true, but because I do not yet see it clearly enough I shall fall asleep so that my dreams will represent it to me more truly and clearly.”

“Le bon sens est la chose du monde la mieux partagée : car chacun pense en être si bien pourvu, que ceux même qui sont les plus difficiles à contenter en toute autre chose, n’ont point coutume d’en désirer plus qu’ils en ont.”

“Je puis me persuader d’avoir été fait tel par la nature que je puisse aisément me tromper même dans les choses que je crois comprendre avec le plus d’évidence et de certitude.”

“I took especially great pleasure in mathematics because of the certainty and the evidence of its arguments.”

“The very desire to seek the truth often causes people, who do not know how it should be sought correctly, to make judgements about things that they do not perceive and in that way they make mistakes.”

“Nothing is made from nothing.”

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“The first was never to accept anything for true which I did not clearly know to be such; that is to say, carefully to avoid precipitancy and prejudice, and to comprise nothing more in my judgment than what was presented to my mind so clearly and distinctly as to exclude all ground of doubt.”

“Truths are more likely to have been discovered by one man than by nation”

“It cannot be denied that he has had many exceptional ideas, and that he is a highly intelligent man. For my part, however, I have always been taught to take a broad overview of things, in order to be able to deduce from them general rules, which might be applicable elsewhere.”

“That we conduct our thoughts along different ways, and do not fix our attention on the same objects.”

“To think? That’s it. It is thought. This alone cannot be detached from me. I am, I exist; that is certain.”

“Good sense is, of all things among men, the most equally distributed; for every one thinks himself so abundantly provided with it, that those even who are the most difficult to satisfy in everything else, do not usually desire a larger measure of this quality than they already possess. And in this it is not likely that all are mistaken the conviction is rather to be held as testifying that the power of judging aright and of distinguishing truth from error, which is properly what is called good sense or reason, is by nature equal in all men; and that the diversity of our opinions, consequently, does not arise from some being endowed with a larger share of reason than others, but solely from this, that we conduct our thoughts along different ways, and do not fix our attention on the same objects. For to be possessed of a vigorous mind is not enough; the prime requisite is rightly to apply it. The greatest minds, as they are capable of the highest excellences, are open likewise to the greatest aberrations; and those who travel very slowly may yet make far greater progress, provided they keep always to the straight road, than those who, while they run, forsake it.”

“The brutes, which have only their bodies to conserve, are continually occupied in seeking sources of nourishment; but men, of whom the chief part is the mind, ought to make the search after wisdom their principal care, for wisdom is the true nourishment of the mind; and I feel assured, moreover, that there are very many who would not fail in the search, if they would but hope for success in it, and knew the degree of their capabilities for it.”

“So far, I have been a spectator in this theatre which is the world, but I am now about to mount the stage, and I come forward masked.”

“He who lives well lives well hidden.”

“thence concluded that I was a substance whose whole essence or nature consists only in thinking, and which, that it may exist, has need of no place, nor is dependent on any material thing; so that “ I,” that is to say, the mind by which I am what I am, is wholly distinct from the body, and is even more easily known than the latter, and is such, that although the latter were not, it would still continue to be all that it is.”

“When it is not in our power to determine what it true, we ought to follow what is most probable.”

“Several years have now passed since I first realized how numerous were the false opinions that in my youth I had taken to be true, and thus how doubtful were all those that I had subsequently built upon them.”

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