100+ Matilda Quotes From The Matilda Movie

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Matilda best quotes

These Matilda quotes are from the Matilda Movie There are so many Matilda quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Matilda quotes exists just do that.

Matilda Wormwood, additionally known by her receptive name Matilda Honey, is the title character of the top of the line youngsters’ novel Matilda by Roald Dahl. She is an exceptionally gifted six and a half year old young lady who has an enthusiasm for perusing books.

Her folks don’t perceive her extraordinary knowledge and show little enthusiasm for her, especially her dad, a used vehicle seller who has played out various verbally injurious activities on her.

She finds she has psychokinetic forces which she uses furthering her potential benefit. In the BBC Radio 4 two-section adjustment of the novel, she is played by Lauren Mote and in the film, she is depicted by American on-screen character Mara Wilson.

Matilda Wormwood is a fearless and sure young lady who has the ability to move articles and buoy them noticeable all around with her eyes. She is a keen young lady who instructed herself, however gets no help from her family.

Matilda is a little youngster of virtuoso knowledge, having created abilities, for example, strolling and discourse at early ages. Notwithstanding, these massive attributes shown by her character are overlooked by her careless guardians who lean toward TV to sustaining their girl’s education aptitudes.

Matilda, consequently, plays down to earth jokes on her folks (her dad specifically, for example, supplanting her dad’s hair tonic with her mom’s bleach blonde hair color and sticking her dad’s preferred cap to his head with Superglue.

After Matilda enters school, Matilda’s sweet-natured instructor Miss Honey takes a quick enthusiasm for her understudy’s benevolence and insight, however is stunned by Matilda’s folks’ absence of respect for her.

The oppressive headmistress Miss Trunchbull, who orders understudies through damaging strategies, challenges Matilda. Matilda is propelled to utilize her newfound capacities against the headmistress, after finding how the life of her adored educator has been influenced by Miss Trunchbull, who is Miss Honey’s auntie.

At the point when Miss Trunchbull winds up prepared to teach Matilda, she utilizes her capacities by composing on a writing slate, acting like the apparition of Miss Honey’s perished dad Magnus, who kicked the bucket a strange passing (which Miss Trunchbull is inferred to have been associated with).

In the film, she likewise shields different kids from Miss Trunchbull’s fury and furthermore utilizes her supernatural power to pelt her with sustenance from the understudies’ lunchboxes. A petrified Miss Trunchbull leaves Miss Honey her appropriate legacy before disappearing.

Miss Honey receives Matilda after her folks escape upon her dad’s misleading strategic policies being uncovered. In this way, Miss Honey turns into the headmistress of the school, notwithstanding her educating obligations.

We have dug up these Matilda quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Matilda Sayings in a single place. These famous Matilda quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Matilda quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Matilda quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences: –

“I thought grown-ups weren’t afraid of anything.”

Matilda best quotes

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“I didn’t. I was on the garage roof.”

Matilda famous quotes

“You two men are gonna be in a lot of trouble very soon.”

Matilda popular quotes

“From a book in the library. I’ve had them since I was big enough to Xerox.”

Matilda quotes

“One second, Dad. I have the adoption papers!”

Matilda saying

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“No more Ms. Nice Girl.”

“To read.”

“No more Miss Nice Girl!”

“Why don’t you run away?”

“You’re very brave, Miss Honey.”

“I wonder what Miss Trunchbull is afraid of.”

“I did it with my powers.”

“It’s not trash, daddy. It’s lovely. Moby Dick by Herman Melville.”

“This is the cottage from your story!”

“The young woman is you!”

“But then… No.”

“Yell at me, okay?”

“Yell at me again!”

“I really hope you have a search warrant. According to a constitutional law book that I read in the library, if you don’t have one, you could lose your job or even go to federal prison.”

“I love it here! I love my school; it isn’t fair! Miss Honey, please don’t let them…”

“I want to stay with Miss Honey!”

“Adopt me, Miss Honey! You can adopt me!”

“All you have to do is sign them.”

“[flips to third and last page] And here.”

“[begins reading aloud to Miss Honey] “Call me Ishmael. Some years ago, never mind how long precisely, having little or no money in my purse, and nothing in particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little…”

“So Matilda’s strong young mind continued to grow, nurtured by the voices of all those authors who had sent their books out into the world like ships on the sea. These books gave Matilda a hopeful and comforting message: You are not alone.”

“The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went on olden-day sailing ships with Joseph Conrad. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village.”

“Matilda said, “Never do anything by halves if you want to get away with it. Be outrageous. Go the whole hog. Make sure everything you do is so completely crazy it’s unbelievable…”

“I’m right and you’re wrong, I’m big and you’re small, and there’s nothing you can do about it.”

“It’s a funny thing about mothers and fathers. Even when their own child is the most disgusting little blister you could ever imagine, they still think that he or she is wonderful.”

“I’m wondering what to read next.” Matilda said. “I’ve finished all the children’s books.”

“You seemed so far away,” Miss Honey whispered, awestruck.

“Oh, I was. I was flying past the stars on silver wings,” Matilda said. “It was wonderful.”

“All the reading she had done had given her a view of life that they had never seen.”

“Here it is,’ Nigel said.
Mrs D, Mrs I, Mrs FFI, Mrs C, Mrs U, Mrs LTY. That spells difficulty.’
How perfectly ridiculous!’ snorted Miss Trunchbull. ‘Why are all these women married?”

“If you are good life is good.”

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“I cannot for the life of me understand why small children take so long to grow up. I think they do it deliberately, just to annoy me.”

“Fiona has the same glacial beauty of an iceburg, but unlike the iceburg she has absolutely nothing below the surface.”

“And don’t worry about the bits you can’t understand. Sit back and allow the words to wash around you, like music.”

“A BOOK?! WHAT D’YOU WANNA FLAMING BOOK FOR?…WE’VE GOT A LOVELY TELLY WITH A 12-INCH SCREEN AND NOW YA WANNA BOOK!”

“Sometimes Matilda longed for a friend, someone like the kind, courageous people in her books.”

“From then on, Matilda would visit the library only once a week in order to take out new books and return the old ones. Her own small bedroom now became her reading-room and there she would sit and read most afternoons, often with a mug of hot chocolate beside her. She was not quite tall enough to reach things around in the kitchen, but she kept a small box in the outhouse which she brought in and stood on in order to get whatever she wanted. Mostly it was hot chocolate she made, warming the milk in a saucepan on the stove before mixing it. Occasionally she made Bovril or Ovaltine. It was pleasant to take a hot drink up to her room and have it beside her as she sat in her silent room reading in the empty house in the afternoons. The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She traveled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village.”

“Never do anything by halves if you want to get away with it. Be outrageous. Go the whole hog. Make sure everything you do is so completely crazy it’s unbelievable.”

“All the reading she had done had given her a view of life that they had never seen. If only they would read a little Dickens or Kipling they would soon discover there was more to life than cheating people and watching television.”

“I have found it impossible to talk to anyone about my problems. I couldn’t face the embarrassment, and anyway I lack the courage. Any courage I had was knocked out of me when I was young. But now, all of sudden I have a sort of desperate wish to tell everything to somebody.”

“You ignorant little slug!” the Trunchbull bellowed. “You witless weed! You empty-headed hamster! You stupid glob of glue!”

“Did you know”, Matilda said suddenly, “that the heart of a mouse beats at the rate of six hundred and fifty times a second?”
I did not,” Miss Honey said smiling. “How absolutely fascinating. Where did you read that?”
In a book from the library,” Matilda said. “And that means it goes so fast that you can’t even hear the separate beats. It must sound like a buzz.”
It must,” Miss Honey said.”

“There aren’t many funny bits in Mr Tolkien either,’ Matilda said.
‘Do you think that all children’s books ought to have funny bits in them?’ Miss Honey asked.
‘I do,’ Matilda said. ‘Children are not so serious as grown-ups and love to laugh.”

“I’m afraid men are not always quite as clever as they think they are. You will learn that when you get a bit older, my girl.”

“A girl should think about making herself look attractive so she can get a good husband later on. Looks is more important than books, Miss Hunky…”
“The name is Honey,” Miss Honey said.
“Now look at me,” Mrs Wormwood said. “Then look at you. You chose books. I chose looks.”

“There is little point in teaching anything backwards. The whole object of life, Headmistress, is to go forwards.”

“There’s nothin’ you can get from a book that you can’t get from a television fastah!”

“In any event, parents never underestimated the abilities of their own children. Quite the reverse. Sometimes it was well nigh impossible for a teacher to convince the proud father or mother that their beloved offspring was a complete nitwit.”

“Both Matilda and Lavender were enthralled. It was quite clear to them that they were at this moment standing in the presence of a master. Here was somebody who had brought the art of skulduggery to the highest point of perfection, somebody, moreover, who was willing to risk life and limb in pursuit of her calling. They gazed in wonder at this goddess, and suddenly even the boil on her nose was no longer a blemish but a badge of courage.”

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“I’ve always said to myself that if a little pocket calculator can do it why shouldn’t I?”

“What she needed was just one person, one wise and sympathetic grown-up who could help her.”

“You mean you live down here?’ Matilda asked.
‘I do’, Miss Honey replied, but she said no more.
Matilda had never once stopped to think about where Miss Honey might be living. She had always regarded her purely as a teacher, a person who turned up out of nowhere and taught at school and then went away again.”

“With frightening suddenness he now began ripping the pages out of the book in handfuls and throwing them in the waste-paper basket.
Matilda froze in horror. The father kept going. There seemed little doubt that the man felt some kind of jealousy. How dare she, he seemed to be saying with each rip of a page, how dare she enjoy reading books when he couldn’t? How dare she?”

“These books gave Matilda a hopeful and comforting message: You are not alone.”

“The only sensible thing to do when you are attacked is, as Napoleon once said, to counter-attack.”

“Matilda longed for her parents to be good and loving and understanding and honourable and intelligent. The fact that they were none of these things was something she had to put up with. It was not easy to do so. But the new game she had invented of punishing one or both of them each time they were beastly to her made her life more or less bearable. Being very small and very young, the only power Matilda had over anyone in her family was brain-power. For sheer cleverness she could run rings around them all. But the fact remained that any five-year-old girl in any family was always obliged to do as she was told, however asinine the orders might be.”

“Make sure everything you do is so completely crazy it’s unbelievable.”

“Never do anything by halves if you want to get away with it. Be outrageous…”

“Well not exactly,” the father said.”Nobody could do that. but it didn’t take me long…”

“Perhaps his anger was intensified because he saw her getting pleasure from something that was beyond his reach.”

“We’ve got a lovely telly with a twelve-inch screen and now you come asking for a book! You’re getting spoiled, my girl!”

“Mr Hemingway says a lot of things I don’t understand, Matilda said to her. ‘Especially about men and women. But I loved it all the same. The way he tells it I feel I am right there on the spot watching it all happen.’ ‘A fine writer will always make you feel that,’ Mrs Phelps said . ‘And don’t worry about the bits you can’t understand. Sit back and allow the words to wash around you, like music.”

“I libri le aprivano mondi nuovi e le facevano conoscere persone straordinarie che vivevano una vita piena di avventure. Viaggiava su antichi velieri con Joseph Conrad. Andava in Africa con Ernest Hemingway e in India con Kipling. Girava il mondo restando seduta nella sua stanza, in un villaggio inglese.”

“So Matilda’s strong young mind continued to grow, nurtured by the voices of all those authors who had sent their books out into the world like ships on the sea.”

“It was pleasant to take a hot drink up to her room and have it beside her as she sat in her silent room reading in the empty house in the afternoons. The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives.”

“What on earth were you trying to do, make yourself look handsome or something? You look like someone’s grandmother gone wrong!”

“She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village.”

“This allowed her two glorious hours sitting quietly by herself in a cozy corner, devouring one book after another. When she had read every single children’s book in the place, she started wandering round in search of something else.”

“You chose books. I chose looks.”

“If it’s by an American it’s certain to be filth. That’s all they write about.”

“Being very small and very young, the only power Matilda had over anyone in her family was brain-power.”

“We don’t hold with book-reading,” Mr. Wormwood said. “You can’t make a living from sitting on your fanny and reading story-books.”

“Shakespeare, daddy.” “Was he brainy?” “Very, daddy.” “He had masses of hair, did he?” “He was bald, daddy.” To which the father had snapped, “If you can’t talk sense then shut up.”

“I’m afraid men are not always quite as clever as they think they are.”

“She decided that every time her father or her mother was beastly to her, she would get her own back in some way or another. A small victory or two would help her to tolerate their idiocies and would stop her from going crazy.”

“The next day she carried her secret weapon to school in her satchel. She was tingling with excitement. She was longing to tell matilda about her plan of battle. In fact, she wanted to tell the whole class. But she finally decided to tell nobody. It was better that way, because then no one, even when put under the most severe torture, would be able to name her as a culprit.”

“What a nice child she is, Miss Honey thought. I don’t care what her father said about her, she seems very quiet and gentle to me. And not a bit stuck up in spite of her brilliance.”

“A newt, she decided, was a useful thing to have around.”

“All the reading she had done had given her a view of life that they had never seen. If only they would read a little Dickens or Kipling they would soon discover there was more to life than cheating people and watching television. Another thing. She resented being told constantly that she was ignorant and stupid when she knew she wasn’t. The anger inside her went on boiling and boiling,”

“It was pleasant to take a hot drink up to her room and have it beside her as she sat in her silent room reading in the empty house in the afternoons. The books transported her into new worlds and introduced her to amazing people who lived exciting lives. She went on olden-day sailing ships with Joseph Conrad. She went to Africa with Ernest Hemingway and to India with Rudyard Kipling. She travelled all over the world while sitting in her little room in an English village.”

“Matilda had never once stopped to think about where Miss Honey might be living. She had always regarded her purely as a teacher, a person who turned up out of nowhere and taught at school and then went away again. Do any of us children, she wondered, ever stop to ask ourselves where our teachers go when school is over for the day? Do we wonder if they live alone, or if there is a mother at home or a sister or a husband?”

“I bambini non sono seri come gli adulti, e ridono volentieri.”

“There are many things that make a man irritable when he arrives home from work in the evening and a sensible wife will usually notice the storm-signals and will leave him alone until he simmers down.”

“A rowdy little girl who gave way upon the slightest provocation to uncontrollable laughter.”

“Good strong hair,’ he was fond of saying, ‘means there’s a good strong brain underneath.’ ‘Like Shakespeare,’ Matilda had once said to him. ‘Like who?’ ‘Shakespeare, Daddy.’ ‘Was he brainy?’ ‘Very, Daddy.’ ‘He had masses of hair, did he?’ ‘He was bald, Daddy.”

“She resented being told constantly that she was stupid, when she knew she wasn’t.”

“Your daughter’s a cheat and a liar,” the father said,”

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“Honey’s Cottage Miss Honey joined Matilda outside the school gates and the two of them walked in silence through the village High Street. They passed the greengrocer with his window full of apples and oranges, and the butcher with bloody lumps of meat on display and naked chickens hanging up, and the small bank, and the grocery store and the electrical shop, and then they came out at the other side of the village on to the narrow country road where there were no people any more and very few motor-cars. And now that they were alone, Matilda all of a sudden became wildly animated. It seemed as though a valve had burst inside her and a great gush of energy was being released. She trotted beside Miss Honey with wild little hops and her fingers flew as if she would scatter them to the four winds and her words went off like fireworks, with terrific speed. It was Miss Honey this and Miss Honey that and Miss Honey I do honestly feel I could move almost anything in the world, not just tipping over glasses and little things like that . . . I feel I could topple tables and chairs, Miss Honey . . . Even when people are sitting in the chairs I think I could push them over, and bigger things too, much bigger things than chairs and tables . . . I only have to take a moment to get my eyes strong and then I can push it out, this strongness, at anything at all so long as I am staring at it hard enough . . . I have to stare at it very hard, Miss Honey, very very hard, and then I can feel it all happening behind my eyes, and my eyes get hot just as though they were burning but I don’t mind that in the least, and Miss Honey . . .”

“You’re cheating people who trust you.”

“Occasionally one comes across parents who take the opposite line, who show no interest at all in their children, and these of course are far worse than the doting ones.”

“When Bruce Bogtrotter had eaten his way through half of the entire enormous cake, he paused for just a couple of seconds and took several deep breaths.”

“Now look at me,” Mrs Wormwood said. “Then look at you. You chose books. I chose looks.”

“Matilda said nothing. She simply sat there admiring the wonderful effect of her own handiwork. Mr Wormwood’s fine crop of black hair was now a dirty silver, the colour this time of a tightrope-walker’s tights that had not been washed for the entire circus season.”

“Matilde non rispose. Rimase in silenzio, ribollendo di rabbia. Sapeva che odiare i propri genitori non era una bella cosa, ma non riusciva ad impedirselo. I libri le avevano mostrato la vita sotto una luce che loro ignoravano. Se soltanto avessero letto un romanzo di Dickens, o di Kipling, avrebbero scoperto che imbrogliare la gente e guardare la televisione non è tutto.”

“She believed she could so she did.”

“When he had finished the second slice, he looked at the Trunchbull, hesitating. “Eat!” she shouted. “Greedy little thieves who like to eat cake must have cake! Eat faster boy! Eat faster! We don’t want to be here all day! And don’t stop like you’re doing now! Next time you stop before it’s all finished you’ll go straight into The Chokey and I shall lock the door and throw the key down the well!” The boy cut a third slice and started to eat it. He finished this one quicker than the other two and when that was done he immediately picked up the knife and cut the next slice. In some peculiar way he seemed to be getting into his stride. Matilda, watching closely, saw no signs of distress in the boy yet. If anything, he seemed to be gathering confidence as he went along. “He’s doing well,” she whispered to Lavender. “He’ll be sick soon,” Lavender whispered back. “It’s going to be horrid.” When Bruce Bogtrotter had eaten his way through half of the entire enormous cake, he paused for just a couple of seconds and took several deep breaths. The Trunchbull stood with hands on hips, glaring at him. “Get on with it!” she shouted. “Eat it up!”

“Fiona has the same glacial beauty as an iceberg, but unlike the iceberg she has absolutely nothing below the surface.”

“Miss Honey gives us a little song about each word and we all sing it together and we learn to spell it in no time. Would you like to hear the song about “difficulty”?’
‘I should be fascinated.’ the Trunchbull said in a voice dripping with sarcasm.
‘Here it is,’ Nigel said.
‘Mrs D, Mrs I, Mrs FFI, Mrs C, Mrs U, Mrs LTY.
That spells difficulty.’
‘How perfectly ridiculous!’ snorted the Trunchbull.
‘Why are all these women married? And anyway you’re not meant to teach poetry when you’re teaching spelling. Cut it out in the future, Miss Honey.”

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