100+ Gene Wilder Quotes That Will Prove He Is One Of The Best Inspirations Out There

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Gene Wilder popular quotes

Gene Wilder quotes that will prove he is one the best inspirations out there. There are so many Gene Wilder quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Gene Wilder quotes exists just do that.

Gene Wilder had been a very famous actor, director, screenwriter, singer-songwriter, author and also a producer.

Gene Wilder had started his career on stage, and he had then made his screen debut in the TV series called The Play of the Week in the year, 1961. Even though Gene Wilder’s first movie role had been in Bonnie and Clyde, his very first role had been as Leopold Bloom in the movie, The Producers for which Gene Wilder had been nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. This had been the very first in collaborations with Mel Brooks, including Young Frankenstein and Blazing Saddles. Gene Wilder is well-known for his work as Willy Wonka in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory and also for his movies with Stir Crazy (1980), Richard Pryor: Silver Streak, Another You (1991) and See No Evil, Hear No Evil (1989). Gene Wilder had directed and written many of his own movies like The Woman in Red.

We have dug up these Gene Wilder quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Gene Wilder Sayings in a single place. These famous Gene Wilder quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Gene Wilder quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Gene Wilder quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences:

“you know, I’m a rather brilliant surgeon. Perhaps I can help you with that hump.”

Gene Wilder best quotes

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“We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams”

Gene Wilder famous quotes

“If you’re not gonna tell the truth, then why start talking?”

Gene Wilder popular quotes “Well, now look here. If it wasn’t you, and it wasn’t you…”

Gene Wilder quotes

“On stage or in the movies I could do whatever I wanted to. I was free.”

Gene Wilder saying

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“As the minuteness of the parts formed a great hinderance to my speed, I resolved therefore to make a being of a gigantic stature.”

“Of course. That would simplify everything”

“I don’t mean to sound – I don’t want it to come out funny, but I don’t like show business. I love – I love acting in films. I love it.”

“I love the art of acting, and I love film, because you always have anther chance if you want it. You know, if we – if this isn’t going well, you can’t say – well, you could say – let’s stop. Let’s start over again, Gene, because you were too nervous.”

“I like – it’s not that I want to be someone different from me, but I suppose it partly is that. I love creating a character in a fantastical situation, like Dr. Frankenstein, like Leo Bloom, a little caterpillar who blossoms into a butterfly. I love that.”

“Actors fall into this trap if they missed being loved for who they really were and not for what they could do – sing, dance, joke about – then they take that as love.”

“But Charlie, don’t forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he always wanted. He lived happily ever after.”

“Time is a precious thing. Never waste it.”

“It’s only with the heart that one can see clearly. What’s essential, is invisible to the eye.”

“Well, my name is Jim, but most people call me … Jim.”

“I met [Gilda Radner] on the first night of filming … Hanky Panky that Sidney Poitier was directing. And it’s funny, I was in costume and makeup – my tuxedo and makeup because I’d done a few shots before she arrived, and she told me later that she cried all the way in, in the car, because she knew that she was going to fall in love with me and want to get married.”

“What did you expect? Welcome, sonny? Make yourself at home? Marry my daughter? You’ve got to remember that these are just simple farmers. These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You know . . . morons”

“I’m funny on camera sometimes. In life, once in a while. Once in a while.”

“I’m not very funny in real life. I used to want to be a comedian when I was 13, 14, 15, till I saw “Death Of A Salesman” with Lee J. Cobb and Mildred Dunnock.”

“I never thought of it as God. I didn’t know what to call it. I don’t believe in devils, but demons I do because everyone at one time or another has some kind of a demon, even if you call it by another name, that drives them.”

“Time is a precious thing. Never waste it.”

“So shines a good deed… in a weary world.”

“I’m in complete remission. I’m alive and well.”

“I like writing books. I’d rather be at home with my wife. I can write, take a break, come out, have a glass of tea, give my wife a kiss, and go back in and write some more. It’s not so bad. I am really lucky.”

“I’m funny on camera sometimes. In life, once in a while. Once in a while.”

“My basic mistake in ‘The World’s Greatest Lover’ was that I made the leading character a neurotic kook and sent him to Hollywood. I should have made him a perfectly normal, sane, ordinary person, and sent him to Hollywood. The audience identifies with the lead character.”

“I love acting, especially if it’s a fantasy of some kind, where it’s not just realistic, it’s not naturalism.”

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“Lots of things are hard work, but I think writing, for me, after I started acting at 13 years old. I like writing now much more than I do acting only because, well, partly because the scripts that are offered are junk.”

“My favorite author is Anton Chekhov, not so much for the plays but for his short stories, and I think he was really my tutor.”

“Little surprises around every corner, but nothing dangerous.”

“I write funny. If I can make my wife laugh, I know I’m on the right track. But yes, I don’t like to get Maudlin. And I have a tendency towards it.”

“I wanted to do – there was this film called ‘Magic’ that Anthony Hopkins did. And the director wanted me. The writer wanted me. Joe Levine said no, I don’t want any comedians in this.”

“The suspense is terrible. I hope it’ll last.”

“And in ‘Frisco Kid’ and in ‘The Woman in Red’ I had to ride badly. Then you have to really ride well in order to ride badly.”

“I love the art of acting, and I love film, because you always have anther chance if you want it. You know, if we – if this isn’t going well, you can’t say – well, you could say – let’s stop. Let’s start over again, Gene, because you were too nervous.”

“Actors fall into this trap if they missed being loved for who they really were and not for what they could do – sing, dance, joke about – then they take that as love.”

“A lot of comic actors derive their main force from childish behavior. Most great comics are doing such silly things; you’d say, ‘That’s what a child would do.”

“Great art direction is NOT the same thing as great film direction!”

“Dont put the sheep on the table.”

“If the physical thing you’re doing is funny, you don’t have to act funny while doing it…Just be real and it will be funnier”

“Which one of us, anywhere in the world, doesn’t yearn to be believed when the audience is watching?”

“I like – it’s not that I want to be someone different from me, but I suppose it partly is that. I love creating a character in a fantastical situation, like Dr. Frankenstein, like Leo Bloom, a little caterpillar who blossoms into a butterfly. I love that.”

“What did you expect? Welcome, sonny? Make yourself at home? Marry my daughter? You’ve got to remember that these are just simple farmers. These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You know . . . morons”

“Invention, my dear friends, is 93% perspiration, 6% electricity, 4% evaporation, and 2% butterscotch ripple”

“As they say in Corsica… Goodbye”

“Where is fancy bred, in the heart or in the head?”

“A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men.This was said by gene wilder … what does it mean ?”

“I never used to believe in fate. I used to think you make your own life and then you call it fate. That’s why I call it irony.”

“The big catalyst was seeing my sister, when I was 11, doing a dramatic recital. When I saw her on the stage and everyone listening to her so patiently, quietly, that’s all I wanted: for someone to look at me and listen to me, but in some beautiful and artistic way.”

“To match the shoes with the jacket is fey. To match the shoes with the hat is taste.”

“What is essential is invisible to the eye,”

“For what we are about to see next, we must enter quietly into the realm of genius!”

“But the acting process – create a human being – was real, not only to the audience, but real to me.”

“So my idea of neurotic is spending too much time trying to correct a wrong. When I feel that I’m doing that, then I snap out of it.”

“I’d like to do a comedy with Emma Thompson. I admire her as an actress so much. I love her. And I didn’t know it until recently that her whole career started in comedy.”

“I don’t mean to sound – I don’t want it to come out funny, but I don’t like show business. I love – I love acting in films. I love it.”

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“If you’re not gonna tell the truth, then why start talking?”

“Invention, my dear friends, is 93% perspiration, 6% electricity, 4% evaporation, and 2% butterscotch ripple”

“As they say in Corsica… Goodbye”

“Which one of us, anywhere in the world, doesn’t yearn to be believed when the audience is watching?”

“What did you expect? Welcome, sonny? Make yourself at home? Marry my daughter? You’ve got to remember that these are just simple farmers. These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You know . . . morons”

“If the physical thing you’re doing is funny, you don’t have to act funny while doing it…Just be real and it will be funnier”

“I never thought of it as God. I didn’t know what to call it. I don’t believe in devils, but demons I do because everyone at one time or another has some kind of a demon, even if you call it by another name, that drives them.”

“dont put the sheep on the table”

“Climbing hills was never one of my great ambitions. Perhaps I was just lazy, but I admit–now that I’ve been climbing a hill every other day–that it’s very difficult to think about the stresses in your life while you’re trying to avoid falling backwards when a goat with large horns is chasing you because you came too close to the little patch of grass he was planning to eat for breakfast.”

“It’s difficult to continue loving someone who shits on you.”

“When I was eight years old, my mother had her first heart attack. After my father brought her home from the hospital, her fat heart specialist came to see how she was doing. He visited with her for about ten minutes, and then, on his way out of the house, he grabbed my right arm, leaned his sweaty face against my cheek, and whispered in my ear, “Don’t ever argue with your mother—you might kill her.” I didn’t know what to make of that, except that I could kill my mother if I got angry with her. The other thing he said was: “Try to make her laugh.” So I tried. It was the first time I ever consciously tried to make someone laugh.”

“I think to be believed—onstage or on-screen—is the one hope that all actors share. Which one of us, anywhere in the world, doesn’t yearn to be believed when the audience is watching?”

“When I walked out of the movie theater I started thinking about my second-grade teacher, Miss Bernard, who used to put up paintings from almost all of the other boys and girls in my class on the classroom walls—paintings that she considered worthy—but she never put up one of mine. She never told me why or gave me an encouraging word, but I got the message: “You’re no good at art, Jerry.”

“How could she not be frightened? I was frightened too. I put my arms around her and hugged her for the longest time. “Don’t worry, don’t worry—you’re not alone. We’ll figure it out, don’t worry.” “I don’t know how it happened. My gynecologist said that it only happens with this new IUD maybe once every 100,000 times.” “Well, that’s a consolation.” She laughed. I pulled down the cover and fluffed up the pillows. Then we both got into bed, and I held her. “I don’t want to make trouble for you,” she said. “I’m so sorry.” “Please don’t say that. You have nothing to be sorry for.” “You’re not angry, dear?” “Of course not. Please don’t talk like that again. We’ll figure out what’s best. Don’t worry now.” And I held her until we both fell asleep.”

“We went to Arizona to film the interiors of Stir Crazy in an actual prison. From Tucson, where we all stayed, it was an hour-and-a-half drive to the Arizona State Penitentiary. Sidney used real prisoners as extras. They had all been cleared by the prison authorities to work with us, and each prisoner was paid for every day he worked.”

“If Columbia Pictures had not succumbed to Richard’s demands, and if I were a cocky, son-of-a-bitch movie star, and if Sidney Poitier had not held in his rage, there would have been no Stir Crazy. For the sake of my psychological health, I should have let out my anger at the time that I was angry. From the point of view of getting the picture made—I’m glad I didn’t. The picture was a great success.”

“Gilda, you’re talking like this is a fairy tale, and you’re going to meet Prince Charming, and everything’s going to be all right, and we’ll both live happily ever after.” “So what’s wrong with that?”

“Gilda, if your marriage is so bad why don’t you get out of it?” “I’m afraid to be alone.”

“The pictures in the magazines almost put me off my job completely. I’ve always hated those color photographs of naked women in those stupid positions that are supposed to turn men on. I never felt that there was anything sexy about them.”

“After ten months of no diagnoses or incorrect diagnoses—with her tummy distended as if she were hiding a small balloon under her dress—she finally heard it: “You have stage four ovarian cancer.” Gilda grabbed my face in her hands and sobbed, “No more bad news, no more bad news. I don’t want any more bad news.”

“Maybe the Demon forced his way in because it was this particular play. As I waited for my cue, I kept thinking that I could shut him out in plenty of time . . . but I couldn’t; the fear of not praying overpowered me, even though it was a matter of seconds before my entrance. I saw both the play and my brain falling apart. Then, somehow, the obligation to the audience and Arthur Miller and my memory of Lee J. Cobb and Mildred Dunnock became more important to me than God. I heard my cue, said my first line . . . and I was safe for the remainder of the play. Years after that, I still carried the inexplicable conviction that once I stepped onto the stage, they couldn’t get me (whoever the hell “they” were) and that I was safe . . . so long as the curtain was up.”

“I covered all topics—everything and everyone whom I could possibly have wronged, including God, of course—and I asked for forgiveness. But in another part of my brain, I was screaming, “FORGIVENESS FOR WHAT?” I had no idea, but the strength of that absurdity couldn’t pierce the armor of my compulsion. When I finished praying, I got up and walked home. My mother, my father, and my pregnant sister, Corinne, were all waiting in the living room, dressed in their robes. From the expression on their faces, I thought that someone had died. My mother started crying. My father spoke first: “We called the police—they just left here. Do you know what time it is? It’s three o’clock in the morning! Where were you? What in God’s name were you doing?” I couldn’t bring myself to say, “I was praying, Daddy—I was lying in a field, praying to God to forgive me.” And if he had said, “Forgive you for WHAT?” I would have said, “I don’t know!” and he would have say, “For eight hours? Are you nuts?” . . . and he would have been right.”

“then I took out a notepad and wrote my first poem. Across three thousand miles of sea and through strange England’s smiling, and into a wee Scots Highland town there is a lad who’s crying. Oh fool the world, he could, he could, a man at twenty years . . . but all alone in that Highland town there is a boy in tears.”

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“It’s very difficult to appreciate when you’re doing it all the time in the business. The laughter means so much to people. I suppose at all times, but especially these days. It seems that life is more difficult. It has been for me, and God knows for Gilda. But I think for everyone, they’re looking for a little relief. I used to think, ‘Sure, to get relief, they get a laugh.’ But I didn’t know the laugh meant that much. Sometimes it’s the difference between going to sleep at night depressed and worried about how you’re going to make it; and going through with a little confidence that it will be okay, it will be okay. Cause laughing is good for you. It’s good for the liver. It’s for the soul. It’s good for your whole emotional equipment.”

“MARGIE: You want to know if she’ll survive? She’ll survive! Living with someone who doesn’t want to be there would do more harm.”

“When we got back to my room, Gilda gave the dog a bowl of water and set some newspaper down in the bathroom for her to pee on. After that was taken care of, I ordered the cheesecake and coffee that Gilda said she has a yen for, and then we continues talking. Sparkle didn’t make a sound — no barking or winning or heaving breathing — she just sat on the floor and looked at the two of us. It must have been strange for her. She was a year old and had been taken from a farm by a stranger, put on an airplane, driven in a limousine, and then hugged and kissed by another stranger. Even when the doorbell rang, she didn’t bark. I thought perhaps she wasn’t able to bark. The waiter brought in the cheesecake and poured out some coffee for us. When Gilda and I started eating the cheesecake, we heard a little peep form Sparkle. She sounded more like a bird than a dog — a very polite bird — but it was obvious that she wanted her share of cheesecake, which Gilda gave her. So the three of us polished off the cheesecake — “One piece, three forks, please.”

“What I didn’t know was that I don’t need to act. I might want to act—just for the love of acting—but not because I need to earn the right to feel loved by God. I’ve got something much better. . . . I feel loved by the person I love.”

“I put my chin on my chest. I was afraid to look at any of the people who were watching us. My lips kept moving without making sounds: Please stop, please stop, everyone’s watching. . . . But at the same time I was thinking, Good for you, Mama, good for you. What courage—to scream in front of the whole restaurant. Poor Daddy. Good for you, Mama.”

“There is one strange irony that I haven’t told you. One April afternoon, three weeks before she died, Gilda walked up to me in our living room and said, “I have a title for you, ‘Kiss Me Like a Stranger’ . . . maybe you can use it some day.” I had no idea why she said it or what the title meant; I just thanked her.”

“When we saw the ascension scene—where I rise with the Creature on an elevated platform and cry, “LIFE, DO YOU HEAR ME? GIVE MY CREATION LIFE!,” my heart sank. I thought this was going to be one of the highlights of the film, and instead it was a boring blob. I put my head down. Mel didn’t vomit. Instead, he got up and started banging his head against the wall. He hit it three times, hard. Then turned his face to the rest of us and said, “Let’s not get excited! You have just witnessed a 14-minute disaster. In one week you’re going to see a 12-minute fairly rotten scene. In two weeks you’re going to see a 10-minute fairly good scene. And in three weeks, you are going to see an 8-minute masterpiece.”

“I’m not a disciplinarian. I understand the need for discipline, of course, but I’m just not good at it. I’m not talking about hitting—I don’t think any parent should ever hit a child—but about setting the rules and sticking by them. How to punish without taking away love—that’s the great art. I wished that I could do it, but I was trapped by the most ironic dichotomy: I was afraid that if I set rules and drew lines and enforced discipline, Katie would take her love away from me.”

“When I make my first entrance, I’d like to come out of the door carrying a cane and then walk towards the crowd with a limp. After the crowd sees that Willy Wonka is a cripple, they all whisper to themselves and then become deathly quiet. As I walk towards them, my cane sinks into one of the cobblestones I’m walking on and stands straight up, by itself . . . but I keep on walking, until I realize that I no longer have my cane. I start to fall forward, and just before I hit the ground, I do a beautiful forward somersault and bounce back up, to great applause.” “. . . Why do you want to do that?” “Because from that time on, no one will know if I’m lying or telling the truth.”

“If the physical thing you’re doing is funny, you don’t have to act funny while doing it. . . . Just be real, and it will be funnier.”

“I held my father’s hand on the ride home that night. After about half an hour of cheerful bantering back and forth, he got quiet. Then he said, “I always told you not to put all your eggs in one basket. Since you were a little boy, I warned you not to put all your eggs in one basket. Now I’m glad you did.” What I didn’t have the heart to tell him was that Start the Revolution Without Me and Quackser Fortune had both failed at the box office, and if Willy Wonka also failed, I didn’t know where my next job would come from, or even if there would be a next job.”

“After I had my drink with them and said good night to James Baldwin and was kissed by Simone Signoret on both cheeks, I went outside, walked close to my car, and threw up on the street. It wasn’t about the food. I may act brave and sometimes outrageous—on screen—but in real life I get terribly nervous when I meet the great talents whom I’ve admired for years from afar.”

“Struggling to be a genius is endemic to young artists who are starting their careers, but after being bloodied a few times, they just hope that they won’t be ridiculed in the press or on television by those few who have the power to coronate them or tear them down.”

“Making Young Frankenstein was the happiest I’d ever been on a film.”

“When the sun finally went down, the cameras started rolling, and I started running around the edge of the Lincoln Center fountain, shouting for all I was worth, “I want everything I’ve ever seen in the movies!” And the fountain was turned on, in the film and in my life.”

“I’m always lonely when I’m on my own—a leftover I think from the Demon, who always struck when I was alone—but towards the end of filming I realized that I was going to be lonelier when I returned to my home and family.”

“I never used to believe in fate. I used to think you make your own life and then you call it fate. That’s why I call it irony.”

“So my idea of neurotic is spending too much time trying to correct a wrong. When I feel that I’m doing that, then I snap out of it.”

“If you’re not gonna tell the truth, then why start talking?”

“Time is a precious thing. Never waste it.” —Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory

“The big catalyst was seeing my sister, when I was 11, doing a dramatic recital. When I saw her on the stage and everyone listening to her so patiently, quietly, that’s all I wanted: for someone to look at me and listen to me, but in some beautiful and artistic way.”

“I didn’t set out to shock. I said, ‘Just tell the truth’ and see how it comes out. I used to be a milksop, beat around the bush, not speak frankly. Now everyone says, ‘Don’t ask Gene, because he’ll tell you.’ ”

“I started writing, just casually writing, the ironies in my life—the strange accidents that turned the corner of where my life was going to.”

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