100+ Forest Whitaker Quotes That Will Make You Get Out OF Your Comfort Zone

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Forest Whitaker quotes

Forest Whitaker quotes that will make you get out of your comfort zone. There are so many Forest Whitaker quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Forest Whitaker quotes exists just do that.

Forest Whitaker is a very famous actor, producer, and also a director and he has earned a reputation of being an intensive character study work for movies like The Crying Game, Bird, Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, Platoon, The Butler, The Great Debaters, and also, Arrival.

Forest Whitaker has made appearances in movies like Black Panther as Zuri and also, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story as Saw Gerrera.

For Forest Whitaker’s role as Ugandan dictator named, Idi Amin in the 2006 movie, The Last King of Scotland, he had won a BAFTA Award, the Academy Award, National Board of Review Award, Golden Globe Award, and Screen Actors Guild Award.

We have dug up these Forest Whitaker quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Forest Whitaker Sayings in a single place. These famous Forest Whitaker quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Forest Whitaker quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Forest Whitaker quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences:

“I do look at that thematic of healing of humanity.”

Forest Whitaker best quotes

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“I’m not trying to defend him, the Amin I found was not a good man.”

Forest Whitaker famous quotes

“It is important to make the best out of every generation.”

Forest Whitaker popular quotes

“I try to be like a forest: revitalizing and constantly growing.”

Forest Whitaker quotes

“Stereotypes do exist, but we have to walk through them.”

Forest Whitaker saying

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“And God, God who believes in us all. And who’s given me this moment, in this lifetime, that I will hopefully carry to the end of my lifetime into the next lifetime.”

“As an actor, I’ve always wanted to do characters that would help me find my connection with others and connect all of us together. You always want the energy of the character, the spirit of the person, to enter you. I’ve been doing this for 26 years and some of the things I’ve done are always with me.”

“As an artist, it’s a great opportunity to play a character like this [Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland]. And then, as a person, I had never been to the African continent. So, I knew, personally, it would reshape me.”

“Because I was playing Idi Amin, who dealt with the colonisation issue, I became aware of this internalised conflict of what it means to be torn between cultures, what it means to be taken over by other cultures.”

“Filming in Africa touched something really deep inside of me, really. It changed my matrix, my insides. My blood even feels kinda different. I don’t know how to describe it. It’s really kind of Eucharistic. I feel like I ate the place and now it’s part of my system, part of my being. I’m not claiming that now I know what it’s like to be African, but that now I have a deeper understanding of myself.”

“He did things like other big men who did things that helped their countries.”

“Hopefully this film is going to open the doors for a lot more films like it to be made.”

“I can play a man who’s despicable. But I’ll still look inside him to find a point of connection. If I can find that kernel, audiences will relate to me.”

“I care about people. In the end, I think they feel it. It comes across, regardless of the character I’m portraying.”

“I certainly don’ think I could’ve played the character [Idi Amin] the same way without being in Uganda. I loved working in Uganda.”

“I could never have gone to Africa another way and had the same experience. It was my job and my joy at the same time.”

“I found the people to be very kind and generous. It was unique because the crew was mainly Ugandan [filming The Last King of Scotland]. They had never done a film before. So, they were learning the process of making films, but at the same time they were also helping with the authenticity of the film.”

“I hope that audiences respond really positively. I think it’s a very intense, entertaining film [The Last King of Scotland], because you’re brought in on a fun ride, and slowly you fall into it as James [actor James McAvoy’s character, Dr. Nicholas Garrigan] does. Nicholas is like the audience. I think it’s a good ride for people. And you learn something, as well.”

“I like to play complex characters and the duality, and trying to reach for the light, it’s more interesting really. I’ve gotten to play so many types of guys and I just try to find the humanity in each one of them the best I can.”

“I never acted in anything I’ve directed but I have produced a number of films and I have acted in some of the movies I’ve produced. Usually with first time filmmakers and pushing a move forward I have played a small role but never the lead.”

“I really wasn’t even sure if I should continue acting. I would like try and figure out if I could be good enough to do it. It was like 10 or 12 years into my career before I felt like maybe I can do it. It was such a different time than now.”

“I started by studying Kiswahili to learn the dialect. Then, I studied tapes, documentaries, footage, and audio cassettes of Idi Amin’s speeches. And I met with his brothers, his sisters, his ministers, his generals’ all kinds of people, in order to try to understand him.”

“I stay true, because whatever the project is, I’m still looking for inside of that character.”

“I think the biggest thing that motivates me when I’m choosing a part is a role that will help me continue to grow as a person and as an artist, and a role that will deepen my understanding of humanity, and my connection to it.”

“I think the place fed me completely. Not only was I in Uganda, but I was around many people who had a personal relationship with Idi Amin. I was eating the food constantly. I was culturally hanging out with the people. You can’t help but absorb the energy, and try to get inside the culture.”

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“I try to serve the character all the time; this one took a lot of work and was consuming. It’s like climbing up a ladder and sometimes you’re afraid to face yourself so you make excuses; you avoid going to the top of the ladder and look in the mirror.”

“I was pretty much consumed by this character. Even when I was off, I was continually searching to find something else new about [Idi] Amin, and to embed myself deeper into the culture to the point that, in the end, I was so entrenched that I could tell what tribe someone was from just by looking at them.”

“I was trying to capture this man’s [Idi Amin] energy, and I did a lot of research in studying him. I tried to capture his ‘Warrior King’ energy inside of me as much as possible.”

“I went through two schools of acting but I learned more about acting from meditating and from my marshall arts teacher.”

“I’m just looking for characters that continue to make me stretch and grow and learn more about the human condition.”

“I’m really excited that people are receiving my performance like this. It makes me feel good, because I’ve been working really hard. And this character [Idi Amin], I worked particularly hard on. But I don’t want to get too caught up in it, because first of all, it could lead to a great disappointment. You never know what’s going to happen.”

“In a lot of films, they’re showing more complete, developed characters of diverse ethnic backgrounds. The larger concern is to be able to tastefully explore the stereotypes, and still move past them to see the core of people.”

“In every project, I always look for the depth of humanity inside of it. I’m just trying to say if we can help in some way heal the equation with [Afro-Americans] what’s going on with us as people.”

“In my career, I’ve had people talking about different things many times, but then not get nominated.”

“It is possible for a kid from east Texas, raised in south central LA and Carson, who believes in his dreams, commits himself to them with his heart, to touch them and to have them happen.”

“It’s a unique experience when you’re doing an independent film where you have one person who puts up all the funds to make the film.”

“I’ve always wanted to do characters that would help me find my connection with others and connect all of us together. You always want the energy of the character, the spirit of the person, to enter you.”

“My parents moved to Los Angeles when I was really young, but I spent every summer with my grandparents, and I’d stay with my grandfather on the farm in Longview. He was retired from the railroad, and he had a small farm with some cows and some pigs. I remember part of my youth was feeding hogs and plowing fields and stuff, so that’s a part of me.”

“On the very last day of shooting [of The Last King of Scotlang], I remember wanting to get the [Idi Amin] character out of me right away, as much as I could. You literally take a bath to wash him off you. Luckily, I went into another part not so long afterwards, so I was kind of able to push it away a little bit. But speech patterns, and little sounds, particularly colloquial things, like the way you ask questions or might respond, were sticking with me, probably because I’d worked so hard to make it a part of my everyday way of expressing myself.”

“Since Idi Amin was from the Sudanese section in the north of Uganda, he was darker skinned. He had more of a blue undertone. So, we did change the coloring of my skin to be closer to his. But otherwise, there were no transformations besides acting.”

“The other night I was walking down the stairs behind one of my daughters. I was tired, and she was goofing around, you know like kids do, doing all this stupid stuff on the stairs. And I was thinking, please just go down the stairs and let’s get you to bed. It’s after your bedtime. I’ve had enough for one day. And then I sort of caught myself. I snapped out of it. I was like, ‘dude, you should be dancing down the stairs behind her’!”

“The true wealth of a community is measured by how carefully it listens to its women and how sincerely it values their wisdom. Empowering women empowers us all.”

“There are people [in Uganda] who hate Idi Amin, a small amount. And then there are the people who really admire him, like a hero. And then there’s a large group who say, ‘We know that all these murders and atrocities occurred, but he did all these great things.'”

“There was a time in my acting career, where I was trying to figure out if acting was the thing to do. You know? I was always on this journey of trying to learn more about humanity and people – using the characters and situations as guideposts. I could switch up and do another job as long as I’m continuing that same search and that same journey of revealing my connection to humanity and the universe. And directing gives me the opportunity to explore ALL these different lives and their connection to their environments and the people. And I get to connect to the wires of the universe.”

“There’s a thing you confront when you’re going into something new and you come to this sort of abyss, and then you push yourself. It makes you try different things.”

“They’re growing up in an environment so different than what I grew up in. I think they’re beginning to see how blessed they are. They’ll be coming back from now on, I think.”

“Things are shifting; man is evolving in many different ways. The Internet has created a portal for people to connect with each other in a way they never could have before. When it comes to African-American or black films, it’s different because there is a model that you can actually look at, an equation that shows that these films earn money.”

“Trying to understand, inside, what it is to be Ugandan was crucial to the character, because there are Ugandan ways of doing things that I was trying to capture. Even if I had made this movie in South Africa, it would not have been the same, because it is so specific to Uganda.”

“Until film is just as easily accessible as a pen or pencil, then it’s not completely an art form. In painting you can just pick up a piece of chalk, a stick or whatever. In sculpture you can get a rock. Writing you just need a pencil and paper.”

“Visit to Africa reshaped my point-of-view of colonialism. It reshaped my point-of-view of my own sense of source, and my own place of birth. It made it more organic inside of me, because it placed me in a position where my job was to understand and to become more African.”

“was a chance to expand myself and deepen my connection with the universe and with God.”

“We have to not just open our eyes to what’s going on in other places; we need to open our eyes to what’s going on right in front of us.”

“When I first decided to act Amin, I had that perception of Amin as presented by the west,”

“When I was a kid, the only way I saw movies was from the back seat of my family’s car at the drive-in.”

“I can play a man who’s despicable. But I’ll still look inside him to find a point of connection. If I can find that kernel, audiences will relate to me.”

“[on his character in The Shield (2002)] I’m always blown away by people’s negative reactions to Kavanaugh. He’s a highly moral man who’s brought to the
breaking point. To me, he’s like an angel. Yes, he’s obsessive. Anal. Intense. But his goal is to get Vic Mackey off the street. This is somebody who beats
people up on a weekly basis, steals money, blackmails people. But I’m the bad guy?”

“My parents moved to Los Angeles when I was really young, but I spent every summer with my grandparents, and I’d stay with my grandfather on the farm in
Longview {Texas]. He was retired from the railroad, and he had a small farm with some cows and some pigs. I remember part of my youth was feeding hogs and
plowing fields and stuff, so that’s a part of me. And my parents raised me to say “sir” and “ma’am”‘ to open doors, things like that. That’s the way I was
brought up. Also, unfortunately, I was taught not to question too much. I didn’t really question my mom and dad. That’s usually what they told me to do.”

“[on being a black actor] I have friends, African-American actors, who’ve had more of a struggle; hopefully they’re starting to see some air and light now.
But in my directing career, in my acting career, in my producing career, I haven’t been bound by a lot of limitations. When I first started doing these kinds
of unique characters, these diverse characters, there was hardly anybody doing them. So I had this open road.”

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“[on his children’s names – True and Ocean – and his name and how it affected his childhood] I want those names to be their destiny, for my daughter to be
honest and my son to be expansive. I try to be like a forest, revitalizing and constantly growing . . . . Kids would tease me, calling me Little Bush”. But .
. . I thought being called Forest helped me find my identity.”

“[in 1998] As a kid, I never had dreams of becoming an actor or director. Even when I was already working professionally, it took me a long time to know
whether this was what I really wanted to be. Now I feel comfortable about what I’m doing, but I see that I can continue to make it better, that I can create
a deeper balance in my life, and I’m still working on that. I didn’t plan for things to turn out this way at all. But I have to say, I feel good about it. I
do.”

“[on the most interesting actor he has worked with] Mickey Rourke, I thought, was really interesting. I did a movie called Johnny Handsome (1989) that Walter
Hill directed. I had a scene with Mickey in which he says goodbye to me, and I learned something very powerful. He didn’t say anything. I don’t know if his
thoughts were so powerful or my imagination was so large, but I could swear I could hear him speaking to me. It was like he was saying, “I want to tell you
thanks–you know, I’m about to disappoint you, but you did a good job”. And then, finally, he says, “Thank you”. I was just like, “Whoa!” He’s an amazing
actor.”

“[on his best work] If I were to mark three, I’d mark Bird (1988), because I grew immensely as an artist–I learned a lot–and also, I think, it was when
people started to take me more seriously. I’d also mark Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999), because I started to understand something about myself in
silence, how I’m capable of communicating certain things without doing much. And then I’d probably mark The Last King of Scotland (2006), which marries the
internal and the external in a strong way and brings together all of the things I’ve learned about my work into one character.”

“[on his career] As an actor, I’ve always wanted to do characters that would help me find my connection with others and connect all of us together. You always
want the energy of the character, the spirit of the person, to enter you. I’ve been doing this for 26 years and some of the things I’ve done are always with
me. Maybe it’s a word; maybe it’s a gesture; maybe the sound; maybe it’s a new understanding about something. I look at it like a past life because I keep
going over and over what I have done.”

“[on choosing studio or independent films] I go back and forth between indie and studio because I feel like it, not because I feel obligated to do one or the
other. The only reason to make a decision like that is financial, you know, you can’t live. That doesn’t make my decision for me, I do what feels right for
me. I’m not going to do a bad movie just because it’s a studio movie or an indie film, and there are hordes of bad independent movies. People tend to think
that indie movies are always good, but I’ve seen horrific ones, just as well as I’ve seen horrific studio films. So I just go by how I feel, it’s the only
way you can figure it out. Otherwise you get lost in the maze of trying to second guess the people, the studio, how you can make your career long or short.
It’s easy to get lost in this maze, called life, really, you know what I mean?”

“[on filming the Panic Room (2002)] The guys on the set, Dwight [Dwight Yoakam], Jared [Jared Leto] and me, would work for a day, and then the next day Jodie
[Jodie Foster] would work. We rarely worked together, so it was all about getting to know some of the guys. With the way scheduling was, she’s not in the
small frame as all of us. They never did it that way. The thing about the film was you did become closer with some people in ways because it took so long.
This is the longest shoot I have ever had. It was about 145 shooting days. We also had rehearsals before that. I think it took so long because of the shots
taken. It was the most planned movie I’ve been involved with.”

“[on his role in The Last King of Scotland (2006)] It was an experience that changed my life and my thoughts. I went there with the purpose of understanding
what it was like to be Ugandan, and I wanted to understand the food, the life, the way they deal with children and wives and with authority figures. I sat
with Idi Amin’s brother underneath a big mango tree and he told me stories about what Idi was like and how he used to come to town and pull together soccer
or rugby games. It all helped me with figuring out the way he behaved and the way he thought, so that 24 hours a day, even in my dreams, I was totally
consumed by the character of Idi Amin. It wasn’t until the movie was over that I decided I could let go of the character, so the first thing I did was take a
shower because I figured I could wash him off by scrubbing myself. I was in a room by myself, so I started yelling to get his voice out of me and get my own
voice back.

“[on getting into acting] In high school I did some musicals, but I never took acting until college. I was studying opera, classical voice, and a speech
teacher asked me to audition for this play and I got the lead. And she helped me to get into a conservatory, with a scholarship as a singer, and then I was
accepted into the acting conservatory. This agent saw me, the summer before I went to conservatory, and while I was in school, I started working right away.
And it worked out.”

“[on his role in Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (1999) and how he prepared] I started reading “The Hagekure” and other books, including one called “The
Code of the Samurai”, and I watched a lot of films. I tried to find his mindset more than anything. It’s more like a trance-like state for this character
than it is anything else, based in the ancient book that he follows. But I did a lot of different types of research.”

“Until film is just as easily accessible as a pen or pencil, then it’s not completely an art form. In painting you can just pick up a piece of chalk, a stick
or whatever. In sculpture you can get a rock. Writing you just need a pencil and paper. Film has been a very elitist medium. It costs so much money. It
doesn’t allow everyone who wants to tell stories tell stories. The great storytellers, however, are going to rise to the top, no matter what. That’s why
independent film is very important to me.”

“My eye? It’s a genetic thing. My dad had it and now I have it. You know, I just found out that it may be correctable a little bit, because it does impair my
vision. When I look up, I lose sight in this eye. I think maybe for other people, it informs the way they see me. But I don’t really think about this eye,
other than the times people talk about it, or when people take photographs of me sometimes they might say stuff about it. I don’t think it makes me look bad
or anything. It just is.”

“[on his role in The Last King of Scotland (2006)) I did a massive amount to prepare for this. First of all I started learning Swahili, learning the accent,
then I had to do study all the recording as well as all the books, tapes, documentaries. When I went to Uganda I met with his [Idi Amin’s] brother, sister,
his ministers, his generals and even to the Ugandan king. I did more research for this role than any other character I’ve probably ever played.”

“[in 2006] I think that there’s an awakening inside of me really honestly, and I honestly believe that the best work of my life is about to happen. I’m
finding a balance in myself as an artist from the external and the internal, and so as a result the characters I play are going to be quite different. So
what’s going to happen is that it’s going to lift up the characters I play, we’re going to start to see it and I think it’s going to change the face of my
career.”

“[in 1996] Directing is more comfortable for me, because as an actor there’s always something inherently false. Because I’m not that person. I can spend a
week in jail, but I’m still leaving. I once talked to a shaman who said, “What makes you think these characters you play aren’t real? I think you should
examine that.’ But it has always been my great frustration as an actor that I can’t go deep into the thoughts, feelings and history of the character. As a
director. I feel like it’s real. I get caught up in the emotions and the story. I like being a storyteller.”

“[on ‘Lee Daniels’ The Butler’] Sometimes in one day I might play three different ages – a 90 year old and a 50 year old and a 30 year old…[working] 20
hours a day. I was working at least no less than 15 usually, to 18…I broke the script down to such a degree that i could see exactly where I was at any
time and what had happened before. I have never worked that specifically. It was one of the most challenging roles I had ever played, and as a result it kind
of revitalized me as an actor. It brought the joy back to acting in a way.”

“[on director Lee Daniels] He’s so present emotionally, and raw. And sometimes you finish a scene and you go over to him, and he’d just be weeping tears in
his chair, crying. Coming over to say ‘Was that okay?’ He’s so present and sometimes he just screams out laughing in the middle of a scene. It’s kind of
exhilarating and sort of unbalancing at the same time.”

“I’ve talked to different groups who are in social activism and stuff and I would say to them ‘You take your photograph right now of the ten of you. You may
think yourselves anonymous and maybe sometimes you might be. But I want you to remember that each step you take is a part of history. That as we live and
breathe, history is occurring. The fact that those photographs we used to see in the ’60s of those individuals that you admire, that you didn’t know their
names but saw them marching down the streets – those are us.”

“We need to have our voices heard, acknowledge things for what they are, because acknowledgment is a big part of the healing of the nation. And then we have
to make a conscious choice so that we can move forward to some form of repentance -some form of recompense, so that we can move into a forgiveness space of
compassion.”

“This oneness that we’re reaching for is a hard thing to fight for because inside of it people are frightened. They’re afraid. There’s a fear, and we have to
pass that fear…This thread, this thing, this machine, the movement that we have to recognize, has not stopped and it’s continuing to move on.”

“[on approaching each role with fresh eyes] There’s a good fear and there’s a negative fear. There’s a thing you confront when you’re going into something new
and you come to this sort of abyss, and then you push yourself. It makes you try different things.”

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“I’ve been fortunate I guess: I’ve gotten to play a lot of very diverse roles for quite a long time. But in the beginning, I was thinking ‘I’m not gonna do
certain characters. I will be willing to say no and and live on a couch’. And I was really happy. Maybe more happy sometimes than in latter years when I had
more, when I was thinking and considering more things for different reasons – for family, for my home. But luckily I was able to at least maintain some sort
of a line. Even if I would veer right or left, I would stay pretty close to center, and the roles were really interesting.”

“[on working with Kasi Lemmons on ‘Black Nativity’] She is a filmmaker who has a broad breadth of understanding. She’s passionate, very open. She inspires you by creating a family atmosphere on set, and you always feel supported by her. I think she had a great vision. To do a contemporary musical with some
attachment to the past is unique.”

“You must ask yourself if you’re standing up for what you know is right, if you’re spending time with people close to you, if you’re treating others with
kindness and compassion. These question are your moral compass, they’re your north star… There will always be forces-things like jealousy, greed, and
anger-trying to push you away from the ideas you believe in and the causes you care most about. Life is an active, not a passive, journey. [in commencement
speech to graduates at California State University, Dominguez Hills]”

“I try to be like a forest: revitalizing and constantly growing.”

“I try to serve the character all the time; this one took a lot of work and was consuming. It’s like climbing up a ladder and sometimes you’re afraid to face yourself so you make excuses; you avoid going to the top of the ladder and look in the mirror.”

“Stereotypes do exist, but we have to walk through them.”

“I like to play complex characters and the duality, and trying to reach for the light, it’s more interesting really. I’ve gotten to play so many types of guys and I just try to find the humanity in each one of them the best I can.”

“There was a time in my acting career, where I was trying to figure out if acting was the thing to do. You know? I was always on this journey of trying to learn more about humanity and people – using the characters and situations as guideposts. I could switch up and do another job as long as I’m continuing that same search and that same journey of revealing my connection to humanity and the universe. And directing gives me the opportunity to explore ALL these different lives and their connection to their environments and the people. And I get to connect to the wires of the universe.”

“I do look at that thematic of healing of humanity.”

“In every project, I always look for the depth of humanity inside of it. I’m just trying to say if we can help in some way heal the equation with [Afro-Americans] what’s going on with us as people.”

“It’s a unique experience when you’re doing an independent film where you have one person who puts up all the funds to make the film.”

“I stay true, because whatever the project is, I’m still looking for inside of that character.”

“There’s a thing you confront when you’re going into something new and you come to this sort of abyss, and then you push yourself. It makes you try different things.”

“It is important to make the best out of every generation.”

“Until film is just as easily accessible as a pen or pencil, then it’s not completely an art form. In painting you can just pick up a piece of chalk, a stick or whatever. In sculpture you can get a rock. Writing you just need a pencil and paper.”

“And God, God who believes in us all. And who’s given me this moment, in this lifetime, that I will hopefully carry to the end of my lifetime into the next lifetime.”

“I really wasn’t even sure if I should continue acting. I would like try and figure out if I could be good enough to do it. It was like 10 or 12 years into my career before I felt like maybe I can do it. It was such a different time than now.”

“In a lot of films, they’re showing more complete, developed characters of diverse ethnic backgrounds. The larger concern is to be able to tastefully explore the stereotypes, and still move past them to see the core of people.”

“My parents moved to Los Angeles when I was really young, but I spent every summer with my grandparents, and I’d stay with my grandfather on the farm in Longview. He was retired from the railroad, and he had a small farm with some cows and some pigs. I remember part of my youth was feeding hogs and plowing fields and stuff, so that’s a part of me.”

“When I was a kid, the only way I saw movies was from the back seat of my family’s car at the drive-in.”

“It is possible for a kid from east Texas, raised in south central LA and Carson, who believes in his dreams, commits himself to them with his heart, to touch them and to have them happen.”

“I care about people. In the end, I think they feel it. It comes across, regardless of the character I’m portraying.”

“I can play a man who’s despicable. But I’ll still look inside him to find a point of connection. If I can find that kernel, audiences will relate to me.”

“We have to not just open our eyes to what’s going on in other places; we need to open our eyes to what’s going on right in front of us.”

“I’ve always wanted to do characters that would help me find my connection with others and connect all of us together. You always want the energy of the character, the spirit of the person, to enter you.”

“The true wealth of a community is measured by how carefully it listens to its women and how sincerely it values their wisdom. Empowering women empowers us all.”

“The other night I was walking down the stairs behind one of my daughters. I was tired, and she was goofing around, you know like kids do, doing all this stupid stuff on the stairs. And I was thinking, please just go down the stairs and let’s get you to bed. It’s after your bedtime. I’ve had enough for one day. And then I sort of caught myself. I snapped out of it. I was like, ‘dude, you should be dancing down the stairs behind her’!”

“I went through two schools of acting but I learned more about acting from meditating and from my marshall arts teacher.”

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