110+ Alexander Pope Quotes From The Satirical English Poet

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Alexander Pope saying

These Alexander Pope quotes are from the satirical English poet. There are so many Alexander Pope quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Alexander Pope quotes exists just do that.

Alexander Pope was conceived on May 21st in the year 1688. Alexander Pope was born in London, England, to Alexander and Edith Pope. Alexander Pope’s Roman Catholic dad was a material trader. Alexander Pope’s family moved out of London and settled in Binfield in Windsor Forest around 1700. Alexander Pope had minimal formal tutoring. Alexander Pope taught himself through broad examining and perusing particularly verse. In spite of the fact that Alexander Pope was sound and stout in his early stages, he turned out to be seriously sick later in his adolescence, which brought about a marginally distorted body – Alexander Pope never became taller than 4 feet 6 inches. Alexander Pope experienced bend of the spine, which expected him to wear a hardened canvas prop. Alexander Pope had consistent migraines. Alexander Pope’s physical appearance, every now and again scorned by his adversaries, without a doubt gave an edge to Pope’s parody, yet he was constantly kind and liberal in his fondness for his numerous companions.

Alexander Pope was intelligent – he demonstrated the attributes of a more established individual at a youthful age as a youngster and pulled in the notice of a prominent book retailer who distributed his Pastorals in the year 1709. At this point, Alexander Pope was at that point at work on his increasingly driven Essay on Criticism in the year 1711 intended to make a resurrection of the contemporary scholarly scene. The Rape of the Lock in the year 1712 promptly made Alexander Pope popular as an artist. It was a long comical ballad in the old style which was a similarity to antiquated Greek and Roman composition. Rather than treating the subject of courageous deeds, however, the sonnet was about the endeavor of a young fellow to get a lock of hair from his darling’s head. It depended on a genuine occasion that happened to individuals Alexander Pope knew. A few different ballads were distributed by the year 1717, which was the date of the principal gathered version of Alexander Pope’s works.

We have dug up these Alexander Pope quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Alexander Pope Sayings in a single place. These famous Alexander Pope quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Alexander Pope quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Alexander Pope quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences: –

“A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. So is a lot.”

Alexander Pope saying

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“Act well your part; there all the honour lies.”

Alexander Pope best quotes

“An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie”

Alexander Pope famous quotes

“An honest man’s the noblest work of God”

Alexander Pope quotes

“And die of nothing but a rage to live”

Alexander Pope popular quotes

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“A little learning is a dangerous thing. Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring; There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, and drinking largely sobers us again.”

“A man should never be ashamed to own that he has been in the wrong, which is but saying in other words that he is wiser today than he was yesterday.”

“A work of art that contains theories is like an object on which the price tag has been left.”

“All forms that perish other forms supply, (By turns we catch the vital breath and die) Like bubbles on the sea of matter borne, They rise, they break, and to that sea return.”

“All Nature is but art, unknown to thee All chance, direction, which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good.”

“All this dread order break- for whom? for thee? Vile worm!- oh madness! pride! impiety!”

“Authors are partial to their wit, ’tis true, But are not critics to their judgment, too?”

“Averse alike to flatter, or offend; Not free from faults, nor yet too vain to mend.”

“Beauties in vain their pretty eyes may roll; Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.”

“Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.”

“Brevity is the soul of wit.”

“Chaos of thought and passion, all confus’d.”

“Charms strike the sight, but merit wins the soul.”

“Death, only death, can break the lasting chain; And here, ev’n then, shall my cold dust remain”

“Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.”

“Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.”

“For forms of Government let fools contest. Whate’er is best administered is best.”

“For he lives twice who can at once employ, The present well, and e’en the past enjoy.”

“For modes of faith let graceless zealots fight, His can’t be wrong whose life is in the right.”

“For when success a lover’s toil attends, Few ask, if fraud or force attain’d his ends”

“Happy the man, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground.”

“Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.”

“Hope springs eternal in the human breast; Man never Is, but always To be blest. The soul, uneasy, and confin’d from home, Rests and expatiates in a life to come.”

“How happy he, who free from care The rage of courts, and noise of towns; Contented breathes his native air, In his own grounds”

“How happy is the blameless vestal’s lot! The world forgetting, by the world forgot. Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind! Each pray’r accepted, and each wish resign’d”

“How vain are all these Glories, all our Pains, Unless good Sense preserve what Beauty gains: That Men may say, when we the Front-box grace, Behold the first in Virtue, as in Face!”

“I am his Highness’ dog at Kew; Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you?”

“If I am right, Thy grace impart Still in the right to stay; If I am wrong, O, teach my heart To find that better way!”

“If you want to know what God thinks about money just look at the people He gives it to.”

“In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold; Alike fantastic, if too new, or old: Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.”

“Inscriptions here of various Names I view’d, The greater part by hostile time subdu’d; Yet wide was spread their fame in ages past, And Poets once had promis’d they should last.”

“Intrepid then, o’er seas and lands he flew: Europe he saw, and Europe saw him too.”

“Know thy own point: this kind, this due degree Of blindness, weakness, Heav’n bestows on thee.”

“Know thyself, presume not God to scan; The proper study of mankind is man.”

“Las palabras son como las hojas; cuando abundan, poco fruto hay entre ellas.”

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“Man never thinks himself happy, but when he enjoys those things which others want or desire.”

“Men must be taught as if you taught them not, And things unknown propos’d as things forgot.”

“Men, some to business take, some to pleasure take; but every woman is at heart a rake”

“Music resembles poetry, in each Are nameless graces which no methods teach, And which a master hand alone can reach.”

“Nature and Nature’s laws lay hid in night: God said, Let Newton be! and all was light.”

“Next o’er his books his eyes began to roll, In pleasing memory of all he stole.”

“No place so scared from such frops is barred Nor is Paul’s Church more safe than Paul’s Churchyard Na fly to alter there they’ll talk you dead For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.”

“No woman ever hates a man for being in love with her; but mainly a woman hates a man for being her friend.”

“Of all the causes which conspire to blind Man’s erring judgement, and misguide the mind, What the weak head with strongest bias rules, Is PRIDE, the never-failing vice of fools.”

“Oh! if to dance all night, and dress all day, Charm’d the small-pox, or chased old age away; Who would not scorn what housewife’s cares produce, Or who would learn one earthly thing of use?”

“One science only will one genius fit/ So vast is art, so narrow human wit”

“Order is heaven’s first law.”

“Our judgments, like our watches, none go just alike, yet each believes his own”

“Our rural ancestors, with little blest, Patient of labor when the end was rest, Indulged the day that housed their annual grain, With feasts, and off’rings, and a thankful strain.”

“Philosophy, that leaned on Heaven before, Shrinks to her second cause, and is no more.”

“Reason’s whole pleasure, all the joys of Sense, Lie in three words, Health, Peace, and Competence. But Health consists with Temperance alone, And Peace, oh Virtue! Peace is all thy own.”

“Remembrance and reflection how allied! What thin partitions Sense from Thought divide!”

“Sir, I admit your general rule, That every poet is a fool. But you yourself may prove to show it, Every fool is not a poet.”

“Some judge of authors’ names, not works, and then nor praise nor blame the writings, but the men.”

“Some people will never learn anything, for this reason, because they understand everything too soon.”

“Some who grow dull religious straight commence And gain in morals what they lose in sense.”

“Sure flattery never traveled so far as three thousand miles; it is now only for truth, which over takes all things, to reach you at this distance.”

“The Dying Christian to His Soul (1712) -Vital spark of heav’nly flame! Quit, oh quit, this mortal frame: Trembling, hoping, ling’ring, flying, Oh the pain, the bliss of dying! Stanza 1.”

“The hungry judges soon the sentence sign, and wretches hang that jurymen may dine.”

“The world forgetting by the world forgot.”

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“Then most our trouble still when most admired, And still the more we give, the more required; Whose fame with pains we guard, but lose with ease, Sure some to vex, but never all to please.”

“This long disease, my life.”

“Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; Thus unlamented let me die; Steal from the world, and not a stone Tell where I lie.”

“Thy voice I seem in ev’ry hymn to hear, with ev’ry bead I drop too soft a tear…”

“To be angry is to revenge the faults of others on ourselves.”

“To err is human, to forgive, divine.”

“To wake the soul by tender strokes of art, To raise the genius, and to mend the heart”

“True ease in writing comes from art, not chance, As those move easiest who have learn’d to dance.”

“True wit is nature to advantage dressed; What oft was thought, but ne’er so well expressed.”

“Trust not yourself; but your defects to know, Make use of ev’ry friend—and ev’ry foe.”

“Vice is a monster of so frightful mien As to be hated needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.”

“We may see the small Value God has for Riches, by the People he gives them to.” [Thoughts on Various Subjects, 1727]”

“What conscience dictates to be done, Or warns me not to do, This, teach me more than Hell to shun, That, more than Heaven pursue.”

“What dire offence from am’rous causes springs, What mighty contests rise from trivial things,…”

“What Reason weaves, by Passion is undone.”

“Whatever is, is right.”

“Where beams of imagination play, The memory’s soft figures melt away.”

“While pensive poets painful vigils keep, Sleepless themselves, to give their readers sleep.”

“Who sees with equal eye, as God of all, A hero perish, or a sparrow fall, Atoms or systems into ruin hurled, And now a bubble burst, and now a world.”

“Why charge we Heav’n in those, in these acquit? In both, to reason right is to submit.”

“Words are like Leaves; and where they most abound, Much Fruit of Sense beneath is rarely found.”

“Yes, I am proud; I must be proud to see Men not afraid of God afraid of me.”

“Yet graceful ease, and sweetness void of pride, Might hide her faults, if belles had faults to hide: If to her share some female errors fall, Look on her face, and you’ll forget ’em all.”

“You purchase pain with all that joy can give and die of nothing but a rage to live.”

“Histories are more full of examples of the fidelity of dogs than of friends.”

“Men must be taught as if you taught them not,
And things unknown propos’d as things forgot.”

“And die of nothing but a rage to live”

“True Wit is Nature to advantage dress’d
What oft was thought, but ne’er so well express’d;
Something whose truth convinced at sight we find,
That gives us back the image of our mind.
As shades more sweetly recommend the light,
So modest plainness sets off sprightly wit.”

“I am his Highness’ dog at Kew;
Pray tell me, sir, whose dog are you?”

“Music resembles poetry, in each
Are nameless graces which no methods teach,
And which a master hand alone can reach.”

“To err is human”

“Man never thinks himself happy, but when he enjoys those things which others want or desire. ”

“Of all the causes which conspire to blind
Man’s erring judgement, and misguide the mind,
What the weak head with strongest bias rules,
Is PRIDE, the never-failing vice of fools.”

“How happy is the blameless vestal’s lot!
The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind!
Each pray’r accepted, and each wish resign’d;
Labour and rest, that equal periods keep;
Obedient slumbers that can wake and weep.”

“An honest man’s the noblest work of God”

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“All nature is but art, unknown to thee;
All chance, direction, which thou canst not see;
All discord, harmony not understood;
All partial evil, universal good.
And, spite of pride, in erring reason’s spite,
One truth is clear, ‘Whatever is, is right.”

“This long disease, my life.”

“An excuse is worse and more terrible than a lie;for an excuse is a lie guarded”

“Whatever is, is right.”

“chaos of thought and passion, all confus’d.”

“The Wit of Cheats, the Courage of a Whore,
Are what ten thousand envy and adore:
All, all look up, with reverential Awe,
At crimes that ‘scape, or triumph o’er the Law:
While Truth, Worth, Wisdom, daily they decry-`
‘Nothing is sacred now but Villainy’
Epilogue to the Satires, Dialogue I”

“Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see,
Thinks what ne’er was, nor is, nor e’er shall be,
In every work regard the writer’s end,
Since none can compass more than they intend;
And if the means be just, the conduct true,
Applause, in spite of trivial faults, is due.”

“What dire offence from am’rous causes springs,
What mighty contests rise from trivial things,…”

“Dear fatal name! rest ever unreveal’d,
Nor pass these lips in holy silence seal’d.
Hide it, my heart, within that close disguise,
Where mixed with Gods, his lov’d idea lies:
O write it not, my hand – the name appears
Already written – wash it out, my tears!
In vain lost Eloisa weeps and prays,
Her heart still dictates, and her hand obeyes.”

“Yet graceful ease, and sweetness void of pride,
Might hide her faults, if belles had faults to hide:
If to her share some female errors fall,
Look on her face, and you’ll forget ’em all.”

“All forms that perish other forms supply,
(By turns we catch the vital breath and die)
Like bubbles on the sea of matter borne,
They rise, they break, and to that sea return.”

“Sir, I admit your general rule,
That every poet is a fool.
But you yourself may prove to show it,
Every fool is not a poet.”

“Brevity is the soul of wit.”

“Authors are partial to their wit, ’tis true,
But are not critics to their judgment, too?”

“The world forgetting by the world forgot.”

“In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold;
Alike fantastic, if too new, or old:
Be not the first by whom the new are tried,
Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.”

“While pensive poets painful vigils keep,
Sleepless themselves, to give their readers sleep.”

“Nor public flame, nor private, dares to shine;
Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine!
Lo! thy dread empire, Chaos! is restored;
Light dies before thy uncreating word:
Thy hand, great Anarch! lets the curtain fall;
And universal darkness buries all.”

“Know thyself, presume not God to scan;
The proper study of mankind is man.”

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