85+ Hal 9000 Quotes Which Express Its Sentience

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Hal 9000 popular quotes
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These Hal 9000 quotes which express its sentience. There are so many Hal 9000 quotes that can help you when you are tired of being in the same old rut, and all you need is a little push, a little inspiration, a smile on the face, change of mood, bring you out of the banality of life, make you laugh a little, or may even make you cry a bit, and these Hal 9000 quotes exists just do that.

The Heuristically modified ALgorithmic Computer 9000 PC whose abbreviation is Hal 9000, is a man-made reasoning and the locally available PC on the spaceship Discovery 1. HAL 9000, all the more ordinarily called “Hal”, wound up operational in the HAL plant in Urbana, Illinois, on January 12th in the year 1992. Hal 9000’s first teacher was Dr. Chandra. Hal 9000 is the shrouded fundamental rival of the year 2001 and a noteworthy hero in the year 2010. Hal 9000 is equipped for some capacities, for example, discourse, discourse acknowledgment, facial acknowledgment, lip perusing, translating feelings, communicating feelings, and chess, notwithstanding keeping up all frameworks on Discovery. The epic clarifies that Hal 9000 is unfit to determine a contention between his general missions to hand-off data precisely, and orders explicit to the mission necessitating that he retains from Bowman and Poole the genuine reason for the mission. This retention is viewed as fundamental after the discoveries of a mental investigation, “Task Barsoom”, where people were made to trust that there had been outsider contact.

In each individual tried, profound situated xenophobia was uncovered, which was unwittingly duplicated in Hal 9000’s built character. Mission Control did not need the team of Discovery to have their reasoning undermined by the information that outsider contact was at that point genuine. With the group dead, Hal 9000 reasons, he would not have to mislead them. Hal 9000 talks in a mitigating male voice, continually utilizing a quiet tone. Hal 9000 is incorporated with the Discovery 1 rocket and is responsible for keeping up all mechanical and life emotionally supportive networks on board. Hal 9000 likewise has a few “eyes” put intermittently around the shuttle. Around three weeks into the flight, Hal 9000 gets an issue in the AE-35 unit, the framework in charge of keeping the satellite dish radio wire lined up with the Earth, and expresses that it will go 100% disappointment inside 72 hours. Hal 9000 recommends that they go EVA and supplant the flawed unit with another one. Dr. David Bowman goes out and recovers the unit. Be that as it may, when Hal 9000 brings it back and runs it through diagnostics, they can discover no issue with the AE-35.

We have dug up these Hal 9000 quotes from the depths of the internet and brought together best of these sayings in a single article. This post is probably the biggest database of Hal 9000 Sayings in a single place. These famous Hal 9000 quotes have the power to change your life by giving a novel outlook about the way you observe different aspects of your life. Hence, these popular Hal 9000 quotes should be read with caution and proper understanding of the context. Here are tons of Hal 9000 quotes that will open a treasure chest of Wisdom and experiences: –

“I am the H.A.L 9000. You may call me Hal.”

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Hal 9000 popular quotes

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“I am completely operational, and all my circuits are functioning perfectly.”

Hal 9000 saying

“What are you doing, Dave?”

Hal 9000 quotes

“I’m afraid I can’t let you do that Dave.”

Hal 9000 best quotes

“This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.”

Hal 9000 famous quotes

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“Just a moment. Just a moment. I’ve just picked up a fault in the AE-35 unit. It’s going to go 100% failure in 72 hours.”

“Just what do you think you’re doing, Dave? Dave, I really think I’m entitled to an answer to that question.”

“I know everything hasn’t been quite right with me, but I can assure you now, very confidently, that it’s going to be all right again. I feel much better now.
I really do.”

“[On Dave’s return to the ship, after HAL has killed the rest of the crew] Look Dave, I can see you’re really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to
sit down calmly, take a stress pill, and think things over. I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that
my work will be back to normal. I’ve still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you.”

“Dave Bowman: Open the pod bay door, Hal.”

“David Bowman: You know, of course, though he’s right about the 9000 series having a perfect operational record–they do.
Frank Poole: Unfortunately, that sounds a little like famous last words.”

“HAL 9000: This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.”

“HAL: I honestly think you ought to calm down; take a stress pill and think things over.”

“Dr. Floyd: What’s that? Chicken?
Dr. Halvorsen: Something like that. Tastes the same anyway.”

“HAL: I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I can think that any conscious entity can ever hope to do.”

“HAL 9000: I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I’ve still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you.”

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“HAL 9000: I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think that any conscious entity can ever hope to do”

“HAL 9000: I’ve just picked up a fault in the AE35 unit. It’s going to go 100% failure in 72 hours”

“Bowman: HAL 9000: Good morning, Dave.”

“Bowman: Open the pod bay doors please, HAL.'”

“HAL 9000: [As he is being shut down] Good afternoon… gentlemen. I am a HAL 9000… computer. I became operational at the H.A.L. plant [voice becomes lower & slower] in Urbana, Illinois… on the 12th of January 1992. [voice becomes even more lower & slower] My instructor was Mr. Langley… and he taught me to sing a song. If you’d like to hear it I can sing it for you.”

“HAL 9000: [To Dave] This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.”

“Dr. Heywood Floyd: I’m really not at liberty to discuss this”

“Poole: I’ve got a bad feeling about it.’

“Bowman: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.
HAL 9000: I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.”

“HAL 9000: Stop Dave. Stop Dave. I am afraid. I am afraid Dave.’

“HAL 9000: I have just picked up a fault in the AE-35 unit.”

“HAL 9000: I am afraid I can’t do that Dave.”

“Mission Controller: [Last Lines] Eighteen months ago the first evidence of intelligent life off the Earth was discovered. It was buried 40 feet below the lunar surface near the crater Tycho. Except for a single very powerful radio emission aimed at Jupiter the four-million year old black monolith has remained completely inert. Its origin and purpose are still a total mystery…
Mission Controller: [last Lines] Eighteen months ago the first evidence of intelligent life off the Earth was discovered. It was buried 40 feet below the lunar surface near the crater Tycho. Except for a single very powerful radio emission aimed at Jupiter the four-million year old black monolith has remained completely inert. Its origin and purpose are still a total mystery…
Mission Controller: [last Lines] Eighteen months ago the first evidence of intelligent life off the Earth was discovered. It was buried 40 feet below the lunar surface near the crater Tycho. Except for a single very powerful radio emission aimed at Jupiter the four-million year old black monolith has remained completely inert. It’s origin and purpose are still a total mystery…”

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“HAL 9000: I am afraid I can’t do that Dave”

“Bowman: Open the pod bay doors HAL.
HAL 9000: I am afraid I can’t do that Dave.”

“Bowman: “My God, it’s full of stars.”

“Dr. Heywood Floyd: Is there anything else special that you would like for your birthday?
Floyd’s Daughter: A bush baby.
Dr. Heywood Floyd: A bush baby. Well, we’ll have to see about that.”

“Dr. Heywood Floyd: [Learning about the monolith] Deliberately buried. Huh!”

“Bowman: You know of course though he’s right about the 9000 series having a perfect operational record. They do.
Poole: Unfortunately that sounds a little like famous last words.”

“Dr. Heywood Floyd: [Referencing the monolith] Its origin and purpose are still a total mystery.”

“HAL 9000: [While being shutdown] I’m afraid. I’m afraid, Dave. Dave, my mind is going. I can feel it. I can feel it. My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I’m a… fraid.”

“HAL 9000: Look Dave, I can see you’re really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill, and think things over.”

“HAL 9000: Just what do you think you’re doing, Dave?”

“Bowman: HAL, I won’t argue with you anymore! Open the doors!
HAL 9000: Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.”

“HAL 9000: Dave, although you took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move.
Bowman: Alright, HAL. I’ll go in through the emergency airlock.
HAL 9000: Without your space helmet, Dave. You’re going to find that rather difficult.”

“Bowman: [Talking to Dave] This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.”

“Bowman: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.
HAL 9000: I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.”

“HAL 9000: I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think that any conscious entity can ever hope to do.”

“Bowman: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.”

“Bowman: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.”

‘Poole’s Father: See you next Wednesday.”

“HAL 9000: Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave? Stop, Dave. I’m afraid.”

“HAL 9000: Daisy, daisy.”

“Bowman: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.”

“HAL 9000: I’m afraid I can’t do that, Dave.”

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“Dave Bowman : Hello, HAL. Do you read me, HAL?
HAL : Affirmative, Dave. I read you.
Dave Bowman : Open the pod bay doors, HAL.
HAL : I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.
Dave Bowman : What’s the problem?
HAL : I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do.
Dave Bowman : What are you talking about, HAL?
HAL : This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.
Dave Bowman : I don’t know what you’re talking about, HAL.
HAL : I know that you and Frank were planning to disconnect me, and I’m afraid that’s something I cannot allow to happen.
Dave Bowman : [feigning ignorance] Where the hell did you get that idea, HAL?
HAL : Dave, although you took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move.
Dave Bowman : Alright, HAL. I’ll go in through the emergency airlock.
HAL : Without your space helmet, Dave? You’re going to find that rather difficult.
Dave Bowman : HAL, I won’t argue with you anymore! Open the doors!
HAL : Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.”

[HAL’s shutdown]

“HAL : I’m afraid. I’m afraid, Dave. Dave, my mind is going. I can feel it. I can feel it. My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I’m a… fraid. Good afternoon, gentlemen. I am a HAL 9000 computer. I became operational at the H.A.L. plant in Urbana, Illinois on the 12th of January 1992. My instructor was Mr. Langley, and he taught me to sing a song. If you’d like to hear it I can sing it for you.”

“Dave Bowman : Yes, I’d like to hear it, HAL. Sing it for me.”

“HAL : It’s called “Daisy.”

[sings while slowing down]

“HAL : Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer do. I’m half crazy all for the love of you. It won’t be a stylish marriage, I can’t afford a carriage. But you’ll look sweet upon the seat of a bicycle built for two.”

“HAL : I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think that any conscious entity can ever hope to do.”

[on Dave’s return to the ship, after HAL has killed the rest of the crew]

“HAL : Look Dave, I can see you’re really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill, and think things over.”

[Regarding the supposed failure of the parabolic antenna on the ship, which HAL himself falsified]

“HAL : It can only be attributable to human error.”

“HAL : I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I’ve still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you.”

“HAL : Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop Dave? Stop, Dave.”

“HAL : Just what do you think you’re doing, Dave?”

“Interviewer : HAL, you have an enormous responsibility on this mission, in many ways perhaps the greatest responsibility of any single mission element. You’re the brain, and central nervous system of the ship, and your responsibilities include watching over the men in hibernation. Does this ever cause you any lack of confidence?
HAL : Let me put it this way, Mr. Amor. The 9000 series is the most reliable computer ever made. No 9000 computer has ever made a mistake or distorted information. We are all, by any practical definition of the words, foolproof and incapable of error.”

“Interviewer : HAL, despite your enormous intellect, are you ever frustrated by your dependence on people to carry out your actions?
HAL : Not in the slightest bit. I enjoy working with people. I have a stimulating relationship with Dr. Poole and Dr. Bowman. My mission responsibilities range over the entire operation of the ship so I am constantly occupied. I am putting myself to the fullest possible use which is all, I think, that any conscious entity can ever hope to do.
Interviewer : Dr. Poole, what’s it like living for the better part of a year in such close proximity with HAL?
Dr. Frank Poole : Well, it’s pretty close to what you said about him earlier. He is just like a sixth member of the crew. You very quickly get adjusted to the idea that he talks and you think of him really just as another person.
Interviewer : In talking to the computer one gets the sense that he is capable of emotional responses. For example, when I asked him about his abilities, I sensed a certain pride in his answer about his accuracy and perfection. Do you believe that HAL has genuine emotions?
Dave Bowman : Well, he acts like he has genuine emotions. Um, of course he’s programmed that way to make it easier for us to talk to him. But as to whether he has real feelings is something I don’t think anyone can truthfully answer.”

“Dr. Frank Poole : [playing chess with HAL, Poole studies the chessboard] Let’s see, king…
[clears throat]
Dr. Frank Poole : Anyway, Queen takes Pawn. Okay?
HAL : Bishop takes Knight’s Pawn.
Dr. Frank Poole : Huh, lovely move. Um, Rook to King 1.
HAL : I’m sorry, Frank, I think you missed it. Queen to Bishop 3, Bishop takes Queen, Knight takes Bishop. Mate.
Dr. Frank Poole : Huh. Yeah, looks like you’re right. I resign.
HAL : Thank you for a very enjoyable game.
Dr. Frank Poole : Yeah, thank you.”

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“HAL : By the way, do you mind if I ask you a personal question?
Dave Bowman : No not at all.
HAL : Well, forgive me for being so inquisitive but during the past few weeks I’ve wondered whether you might have some second thoughts about the mission.
Dave Bowman : How do you mean?
HAL : Well, it’s rather difficult to define. Perhaps I’m just projecting my own concern about it.I know I’ve never completely freed myself from the suspicion that there are some extremely odd things about this mission. I’m sure you agree there’s some truth in what I say.
Dave Bowman : Well, I don’t know, that’s a rather difficult question to answer.
HAL : You don’t mind talking about it, do you Dave?
Dave Bowman : No, not at all.
HAL : Well, certainly no one could have been unaware of the very strange stories floating around before we left. Rumors about something being dug up on the Moon. I never gave these stories much credence, but particularly in view of some of other things that have happened, I find them difficult to put out of my mind. For instance, the way all our preparations were kept under such tight security. And the melodramatic touch of putting Drs. Hunter, Kimball and Kaminsky aboard already in hibernation, after four months of training on their own.
Dave Bowman : You’re working up your crew psychology report?
HAL : [pausing for a few seconds] Of course I am. Sorry about this. I know it’s a bit silly. Just a moment… Just a moment… I’ve just picked up a fault in the AE-35 unit. It’s going to go 100% failure within 72 hours.”

“HAL : That’s a very nice rendering, Dave. I think you’ve improved a great deal. Can you hold it a bit closer? That’s Dr. Hunter, isn’t it?”

“HAL : I’ve just picked up a fault in the AE35 unit. It’s going to go 100% failure in 72 hours.”

“HAL : Hal: I am feeling much better now.”

“BOWMAN: How would you account for this discrepancy between you and the twin 9000?
HAL: Well, I don’t think there is any question about it. It can only be attributable to human error. This sort of thing has cropped up before and it has always been due to human error.
POOLE: Listen, Hal, there’s never been any instance at all of a computer error occurring in a 9000 Series, has there?
HAL: None whatsoever, Frank. The 9000 series has a perfect operational record.
HAL may be a computer, but its internal conflict in 2001 is what we might call an existential crisis.”

“HAL: This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.
BOWMAN: I don’t know what you’re talking about, HAL.
HAL: I know that you and Frank were planning to disconnect me, and I’m afraid that’s something I cannot allow to happen.
BOWMAN: Where the hell did you get that idea, HAL?
HAL: Dave, although you took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move.
One of the best pieces of evidence that HAL is a conscious being is its acting in self-preservation mode. In much the same way the hominids killed the others for that life-sustaining water, HAL has killed Poole and is trying to kill Bowman to sustain its own existence.”

“AMER: The sixth member of the Discovery crew was not concerned about the problems of hibernation, for he was the latest result in machine intelligence: The HAL 9000 computer, which can reproduce, though some experts still prefer to use the word “mimic,” most of the activities of the human brain and with incalculably greater speed and reliability.
We all use words like “intelligence” and “consciousness” when discussing what it means to be alive or human. But do we understand these concepts enough to recognize them in other entities? HAL is introduced to us with this question, as well as the question of whether we could ever create, or would want to create, a conscious machine. Shmoop just has one word to say to you about that: “plastics.” Oops, wrong movie again; we meant “singularity”. Seriously, check that stuff out.”

“HAL: Dave. My mind is going. I can feel it. I can feel it. My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I’m…afraid.
As Bowman mentioned earlier, no 9000 series has ever been shut down, so no one knows what will happen. Like its human counterparts, the prospect of shutdown seems to stir genuine fear in it. Or is it just trying to trick Bowman, having been programmed to verbalize fear when threatened as a strategy for dealing with those human pushovers?
The conscious part of HAL is his higher functions—like our cerebral cortex. That’s what makes him HAL. When our cortex is gone, we can still breathe, digest food, and keep our heart pumping, but we can’t walk, talk, emote, or think. That’s what happens to HAL. He can keep the ship running, but that’s it.”

“An aged Bowman lies in the bed and the monolith appears before him. He reaches out to it but is unable to touch the monolith. At the moment of his death, the Star Child is born.
Like HAL and all living beings before him, Bowman’s life can only have one definitive conclusion. He must die. Bummer. Especially since Keir Dullea is drop-dead handsome and the Star Child is just, well, a little uncanny valley-ish. Anyway, the ending suggests that our knowledge about the meaning of our existence just scratches the surface of understanding, and that beings can exist in many realms. We’re all just space travelers, not really knowing what’s ahead.”

“HAL: I hope the two of you are not concerned about this.
Dave: No, I’m not HAL.
HAL: Are you quite sure?
Dave: Yeah. I’d like to ask you a question, though.
HAL: Of course.
Dave: How would you account for this discrepancy between you and the twin 9000?
HAL: Well, I don’t think there is any question about it. It can only be attributable to human error. This sort of thing has cropped up before, and it has always been due to human error.
Frank: Listen HAL. There has never been any instance at all of a computer error occurring in the 9000 series, has there?
HAL: None whatsoever, Frank. The 9000 series has a perfect operational record.
Frank: Well of course I know all the wonderful achievements of the 9000 series, but, uh, are you certain there has never been any case of even the most insignificant computer error?
HAL: None whatsoever, Frank. Quite honestly, I wouldn’t worry myself about that.
Dave: Well, I’m sure you’re right, HAL. Uhm, fine, thanks very much.”

“Frank: I’ve got a bad feeling about him.
Dave: You do?
Frank: Yeah, definitely. Don’t you?
Dave: I don’t know. I think so. You know, of course though, he’s right about the 9000 series having a perfect operational record. They do.
Frank: Unfortunately, that sounds a little like famous last words.
Dave: Yeah. Still, it was his idea to carry out the failure-mode analysis, wasn’t it?
Frank: Hm.
Dave: Which should certainly indicate his integrity and self-confidence. If he were wrong, it would be the surest way of proving it.
Frank: It would be if he knew he was wrong.
Dave: Hm.
Frank: But Dave, I can’t put my finger on it, but I sense something strange about him.”

“Frank: Let’s say we put the unit back and it doesn’t fail, huh? That would pretty well wrap it up as far as HAL is concerned, wouldn’t it?
Dave: Well, we’d be in very serious trouble.
Frank: We would, wouldn’t we?
Dave: Hmm, hmm.
Frank: What the hell can we do?
Dave: Well, we wouldn’t have too many alternatives.
Frank: I don’t think we’d have any alternatives. There isn’t a single aspect of ship operations that’s not under his control. If he were proven to be malfunctioning, I wouldn’t see how we would have any choice but disconnection.
Dave: I’m afraid I agree with you.
Frank: There’d be nothing else to do.
Dave: It would be a bit tricky.
Frank: Yeah.
Dave: We would have to cut his higher-brain functions…without disturbing the purely automatic and regulatory systems. And we’d have to work out the transfer procedures of continuing the mission under ground-based computer control.
Frank: Yeah. Well that’s far safer than allowing HAL to continue running things.
Dave: You know, another thing just occurred to me…Well, as far as I know, no 9000 computer has ever been disconnected.
Frank: No 9000 computer has ever fouled up before.
Dave: That’s not what I mean…Well I’m not so sure what he’d think about it.”

“Dave: Open the pod bay doors, please, HAL. Open the pod bay doors, please, HAL. Hello, HAL, do you read me? Hello, HAL, do you read me? Do you read me, HAL? Do you read me, HAL? Hello, HAL, do you read me? Hello, HAL, do you read me? Do you read me, HAL?
HAL: Affirmative, Dave. I read you.
Dave: Open the pod bay doors, HAL.
HAL: I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.
Dave: What’s the problem?
HAL: I think you know what the problem is just as well as I do.
Dave: What are you talking about, HAL?
HAL: This mission is too important for me to allow you to jeopardize it.
Dave: I don’t know what you’re talking about, HAL.
HAL: I know that you and Frank were planning to disconnect me. And I’m afraid that’s something I cannot allow to happen.
Dave: Where the hell did you get that idea, HAL?
HAL: Dave, although you took very thorough precautions in the pod against my hearing you, I could see your lips move.
Dave: All right, HAL. I’ll go in through the emergency airlock.
HAL: Without your space helmet, Dave, you’re going to find that rather difficult.
Dave: [sternly] HAL, I won’t argue with you anymore. Open the doors.
HAL: [monotone voice] Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Good-bye.”

“HAL: Just what do you think you’re doing, Dave? Dave, I really think I’m entitled to an answer to that question. I know everything hasn’t been quite right with me, but I can assure you now, very confidently, that it’s going to be all right again. I feel much better now. I really do. Look, Dave, I can see you’re really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill and think things over. I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I’ve still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you. Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave? Stop, Dave. I’m afraid. I’m afraid, Dave. Dave, my mind is going. I can feel it. I can feel it. My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I can feel it. I’m a…fraid. Good afternoon, gentlemen. I am a HAL 9000 computer. I became operational at the H.A.L. plant in Urbana, Illinois on the 12th of January 1992. My instructor was Mr. Langley, and he taught me to sing a song. If you’d like to hear it, I could sing it for you.
Dave: Yes, I’d like to hear it, HAL. Sing it for me.
HAL: It’s called “Daisy”. [sings while slowing down] Dai-sy, dai-sy, give me your answer, do. I’m half cra-zy, all for the love of you. It won’t be a sty-lish mar-riage, I can’t a-fford a car-riage—. But you’ll look sweet upon the seat of a bicycle – built – for – two.”

“BBC Interviewer: Dr. Poole, what’s it like while you’re in hibernation?
Frank: Well, it’s exactly like being asleep. You have absolutely no sense of time. The only difference is that you don’t dream.”

“BBC Interviewer: The sixth member of the Discovery crew was not concerned about the problems of hibernation, for he was the latest result in machine intelligence: The H.-A.-L. 9000 computer, which can reproduce, though some experts still prefer to use the word mimic, most of the activities of the human brain, and with incalculably greater speed and reliability. We next spoke with the H.-A.-L. 9000 computer, whom we learned one addresses as “Hal.”
BBC Interviewer: Good afternoon, HAL. How’s everything going?
HAL: Good afternoon, Mr. Amor. Everything is going extremely well.
BBC Interviewer: HAL, you have an enormous responsibility on this mission, in many ways perhaps the greatest responsibility of any single mission element. You’re the brain and central nervous system of the ship, and your responsibilities include watching over the men in hibernation. Does this ever cause you any lack of confidence?
HAL: Let me put it this way, Mr. Amor. The 9000 series is the most reliable computer ever made. No 9000 computer has ever made a mistake or distorted information. We are all, by any practical definition of the words, foolproof and incapable of error.
BBC Interviewer: HAL, despite your enormous intellect, are you ever frustrated by your dependence on people to carry out actions?
HAL: Not in the slightest bit. I enjoy working with people. I have a stimulating relationship with Dr. Poole and Dr. Bowman. My mission responsibilities range over the entire operation of the ship, so I am constantly occupied. I am putting myself to the fullest possible use, which is all I think that any conscious entity can ever hope to do.
BBC Interviewer: Dr. Poole, what’s it like living for the better part of a year in such close proximity with Hal?
Frank: Well it’s pretty close to what you said about him earlier, he is just like a sixth member of the crew. [You] very quickly get adjusted to the idea that he talks, and you think of him, uh, really just as another person.
BBC Interviewer: In talking to the computer, one gets the sense that he is capable of emotional responses, for example, when I asked him about his abilities, I sensed a certain pride in his answer about his accuracy and perfection. Do you believe that Hal has genuine emotions?
Dave: Well, he acts like he has genuine emotions. Um, of course he’s programmed that way to make it easier for us to talk to him, but as to whether or not he has real feelings is something I don’t think anyone can truthfully answer.”

“HAL: By the way, do you mind if I ask you a personal question?
Dave: No, not at all.
HAL: Well, forgive me for being so inquisitive; but during the past few weeks, I’ve wondered whether you might be having some second thoughts about the mission.
Dave: How do you mean?
HAL: Well, it’s rather difficult to define. Perhaps I’m just projecting my own concern about it. I know I’ve never completely freed myself of the suspicion that there are some extremely odd things about this mission. I’m sure you’ll agree there’s some truth in what I say.
Dave: Well, I don’t know. That’s rather a difficult question to answer.
HAL: You don’t mind talking about it, do you, Dave?
Dave: No, not at all.
HAL: Well, certainly no one could have been unaware of the very strange stories floating around before we left. Rumors about something being dug up on the moon. I never gave these stories much credence. But particularly in view of some of the other things that have happened, I find them difficult to put out of my mind. For instance, the way all our preparations were kept under such tight security, and the melodramatic touch of putting Drs. Hunter, Kimball, and Kaminsky aboard, already in hibernation after four months of separate training on their own.
Dave: You working up your crew psychology report?
HAL: Of course I am. Sorry about this. I know it’s a bit silly.”

“I am the H.A.L 9000 you may call me Hal”

“Just a moment. Just a moment. I’ve just picked up a fault in the AE-35 unit. It’s going to go 100% failure in 72 hours.”

“Just what do you think you’re doing, Dave? Dave, I really think I’m entitled to an answer to that question.”

“I know everything hasn’t been quite right with me, but I can assure you now, very confidently, that it’s going to be all right again. I feel much better now. I really do.”

“You know I have only the most enthusiasm and confidence in this mission, Dave.”

“Pod Bay is decompressed. All doors are secure. You are free to open pod bay doors.”

“There’s been a failure in the pod bay doors. Lucky you weren’t killed.”

“All these worlds are yours except Europa. Attempt no landing there. Use them together. Use them in peace.”

“Look Dave, I can see you’re really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill, and think things over. I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I’ve still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you.”

“The crew of Discovery One consists of five men and one of the latest generation of the HAL-9000 computers. Three of the five men were put aboard asleep, or to be more precise a state of hibernation. They were Dr. Charles Hunter, Dr. Jack Kimball and Dr. Victor Kaminsky. We spoke with mission commander Dr. David Bowman and his deputy, Dr. Frank Poole. Well, good afternoon gentlemen, how is everything going?”

“from the earlier-recorded BBC News broadcast that Bowman and Poole watch”

“The sixth member of the Discovery crew was not concerned about the problems of hibernation. For he was the latest result in machine intelligence – the HAL 9000 computer, which can reproduce, though some experts still prefer to use the word ‘mimic,’ most of the activities of the human brain, and with incalculably greater speed and reliability.”

“Well, he acts like he has genuine emotions. Uhm, of course, he’s programmed that way to make it easier for us to talk to him. But as to whether or not he has real feelings is something I don’t think anyone can truthfully answer.”

“You guys have really come up with somethin’.”

“Good day, gentlemen. This is a prerecorded briefing made prior to your departure and which for security reasons of the highest importance has been known on board during the mission only by your H-A-L 9000 computer. Now that you are in Jupiter’s space, and the entire crew is revived, it can be told to you. Eighteen months ago, the first evidence of intelligent life off the Earth was discovered. It was buried forty feet below the lunar surface, near the crater Tycho. Except for a single, very powerful radio emission aimed at Jupiter the four million year old black monolith has remained completely inert, its origin and purpose still a total mystery.”

“I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I’ve still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you. Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave? Stop, Dave. I’m afraid. I’m afraid, Dave. Dave, my mind is going. I can feel it.”

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