140+ Alice In Wonderland Quotes That Will Remind You Of The Various Morals That The Novel Has

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Alice in Wonderland quotes that will remind you of the various morals that the novel has contributed. There are days when you need to read a few quotes to really laugh it off or cry your heart out. There are quotes that come from many movies and novels that have really touched our hearts. They have been spoken by many characters from various stories and shows and these will always help you in many ways you never knew. There are so many Alice In Wonderland quotes that can help you take a break and remember what you had heard or read and even walk down memory lane. Just like quotes have been said my many wise people, we have quotes by authors and even characters in their books and movies. The entire internet is full of a lot of great Alice In Wonderland quotes that will make you look at life through new eyes and also let your emotions out-laugh at them or cry with them. These Alice In Wonderland quotes will help make your day and you will feel better when you are taking a break and also help you remember some great moments in Alice In Wonderland.

Alice In Wonderland is a very famous novel published in the year, 1865 by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and he goes by the pseudonym, Lewis Carroll. This story is about a young girl named Alice, and she falls right through a rabbit hole and enters a fantasy world that is full of many wierd and peculiar creatures. This story plays with logic, and gives the story a pretty lasting popularity with adults and also with children. Alice In Wonderland has been considered to be a good best examples of the literary nonsense genre. Before Alice received her copy, the author had been preparing it for publication and expanding the 15,500-word original to 27,500 words.

So many characters and authors have spoken words of wisdom and these have become household quotes in schools and homes. There also quotes about different days like Christmas, Memorial Day, New Year, etc. All these quotes have helped many people across the world when they want to indulge in a few quotes on the internet. As you go through these Alice In Wonderland quotes, you will really enjoy yourself and will also realise what Alice In Wonderland is all about.

The book’s structure, narrative course, imagery and characters are very influential in literature and culture, especially in the field of fantasy. On 26 November in the year, 1864 the author had given Alice In Wonderland the handwritten manuscript of Alice’s Adventures Under Ground, with a lot of the illustrations done by himself and he had dedicated it as “A Christmas Gift to a Dear Child in Memory of a Summer’s Day”. Some people like Martin Gardner have speculated that there had been an earlier version that was destroyed by Dodgson.

The phrasing of the statements contributes to a lot to the effectiveness of the quotes and a study conducted in the year, 2000 had proven that when people were shown two statements of the same saying, the participants said that preferred the rhyming aphorism quotes.Alice In Wonderland quotes are just like these so you will surely love them.

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Alice In Wonderland has really given the world a lot of moments to remember and also we can try and apply them to our lives and our situations and try and make a better future for ourselves. These Alice In Wonderland quotes will help you in renewing your spirit and mind in ways you have never imagined. As you scroll down the page and read these Alice In Wonderland quotes, be ready to see a new you, because these quotes are more than just words, they are magic and the truth of life that will change the way you think. So, here we have for you some Alice In Wonderland quotes which will paint a new picture of life for you.

1. “I don’t think…” then you shouldn’t talk, said the Hatter.”

2. “It is better to be feared than loved.”

3. “People who don’t think shouldn’t talk”

4. “…Is Wonderland really a wonder…when you have nowhere to land?”

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5. “I’m older than you, and must know better.”

5. “The best way to explain it is to do it.”

6. “The Duchess! The Duchess! Oh my dear paws! Oh my fur and whiskers! She’ll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets!”

7. “What do you mean by that?” said the Caterpillar, sternly. “Explain yourself!”

8. “I ca’n’t explain myself, I’m afraid, Sir,” said Alice, “because I am not myself, you see.”

9. “Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”
“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat.
“I don’t much care where—” said Alice.
“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat.
“—so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added as an explanation.
“Oh, you’re sure to do that,” said the Cat, “if you only walk long enough.”

10. “In that direction,” the Cat said, waving its right paw round, “lives a Hatter: and in that direction,” waving the other paw, “lives a March Hare. Visit either you like: they’re both mad.”
“But I don’t want to go among mad people,” Alice remarked.
“Oh, you ca’n’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”
“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice.
“You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”

11. “To begin with,” said the Cat, “a dog’s not mad. You grant that?”
“I suppose so,” said Alice.
“Well, then,” the Cat went on, “you see a dog growls when it’s angry, and wags it’s tail when it’s pleased. Now I growl when I’m pleased, and wag my tail when I’m angry. Therefore I’m mad.”
“I call it purring, not growling,” said Alice.
“Call it what you like,” said the Cat.

12. “If everybody minded their own business,” the Duchess said, in a hoarse growl, “the world would go round a deal faster than it does.”
“Tut, tut, child!” said the Duchess. “Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it.”

13. “And the moral of that is—’Oh, ‘tis love, ‘tis love, that makes the world go round!’”
“Somebody said,” Alice whispered, “that it’s done by everybody minding their own business!”
“Ah well! It means much the same thing,” said the Duchess, digging her sharp little chin into Alice’s shoulder as she added, “and the moral of that is—‘Take care of the sense, and the sounds will take care of themselves.”

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14. “And the moral of that is—‘Be what you would seem to be’—or, if you’d like it put more simply—‘Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise.”

15. “Really, now you ask me,” said Alice, very much confused, “I don’t think—”
“Then you shouldn’t talk,” said the Hatter.

16. “Take some more tea,” the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.
“I’ve had nothing yet,” Alice replied in an offended tone: “so I ca’n’t take more.”
“You mean you can’t take less,” said the Hatter: “It’s very easy to take more than nothing.”

17. “Have some wine,” the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.
Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. “I don’t see any wine,” she remarked.
“There isn’t any,” said the March Hare.
“Then it wasn’t very civil of you to offer it,” said Alice angrily.
“It wasn’t very civil of you to sit down without being invited,” said the March Hare.

18. “When we were little,” the Mock Turtle went on at last, more calmly, though still sobbing a little now and then,” we went to school in the sea. The master was an old Turtle—we used to call him Tortoise—”
“Why did you call him Tortoise, if he wasn’t one?” asked Alice.
“We called him Tortoise because he taught us,” said the Mock Turtle angrily. “Really you are very dull!”

19. “And how many hours a day did you do lessons?” said Alice, in a hurry to change the subject.
“Ten hours the first day,” said the Mock Turtle: “nine the next, and so on.”
“What a curious plan!” exclaimed Alice.
“That’s the reason they’re called lessons,” the Gryphon remarked: “because they lessen from day to day.” —Chapter 9, The Mock Turtle’s Story

20. The Queen turned crimson with fury, and, after glaring at her for a moment like a wild beast, began screaming “Off with her head! Off with—”
“Nonsense!” said Alice, very loudly and decidedly, and the Queen was silent.

“No, no!” said the Queen. “Sentence first—verdict afterwards.”

“I don’t like the look of it at all,” said the King: “however, it may kiss my hand, if it likes.”

“If there’s no meaning in it,” said the King, “that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn’t try to find any.”

“Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”

“If you didn’t sign it,” said the King, “that only makes the matter worse. You must have meant some mischief, or else you’d have signed your name like an honest man.”

“It’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.”

“Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle.”

“If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does.”

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

“I don’t think…” then you shouldn’t talk, said the Hatter.

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?” “That depends a good deal on where you want to get to.” “I don’t much care where –” “Then it doesn’t matter which way you go.”

“Begin at the beginning”, the King said gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”

“Curiouser and curiouser!”

“Oh, you can’t help that,” said the Cat: “we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.” “How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice. “You must be,” said the Cat, or you wouldn’t have come here.”

“And what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?”

“Then you should say what you mean,” the March Hare went on. “I do,” Alice hastily replied; “at least — at least I mean what I say — that’s the same thing, you know.” “Not the same thing a bit!” said the Hatter. “You might just as well say that “I see what I eat” is the same thing as “I eat what I see”!”

“Who cares for you?” said Alice, (she had grown to her full size by this time.) “You’re nothing but a pack of cards!”

“Off with her head!”

“Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin,” thought Alice; “but a grin without a cat! It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in all my life!”

“The Duchess! The Duchess! Oh my dear paws! Oh my fur and whiskers! She’ll get me executed, as sure as ferrets are ferrets!”

“You know you say things are “much of a muchness”?—?did you ever see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness?’

“She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it),”

“Contrariwise,” continued Tweedledee, “if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic.”

“Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it.”

“How long is forever?
Sometimes just one second”

“How come “burbled” gets to be in the Oxford English Dictionary but “tulgy” doesn’t? Hm?”

“Lewis Carroll. He was an odd one. Real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson. Completely denied having anything to do with the Alice books. Daft as a brush. You’d have liked him!”

“And what is the use of a book,” thought Alice, “without pictures or conversations?”

“How funny it’ll seem to come out among the people that walk with their heads downwards! The antipathies, I think—”

“Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if only I knew how to begin.” For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very few things indeed were really impossible.

It was all very well to say “Drink me,” but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. “No, I’ll look first,” she said, “and see whether it’s marked ‘poison’ or not.”
“But it’s no use now,” thought poor Alice, “to pretend to be two people! Why, there’s hardly enough of me left to make one respectable person!”

“Curiouser and curiouser!” cried Alice (she was so much surprised, that for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English).

“I wish I hadn’t cried so much!” said Alice, as she swam about, trying to find her way out. “I shall be punished for it now, I suppose, by being drowned in my own tears! That will be a queer thing, to be sure! However, everything is queer to-day.”
“I suppose I ought to eat or drink something or other; but the great question is ‘What?’”

“I do wish I hadn’t drunk quite so much!”
“When I used to read fairy tales, I fancied that kind of thing never happened, and now here I am in the middle of one!” l

“Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin,” thought Alice; “but a grin without a cat! It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in all my life!”

“How do you like the Queen?” said the Cat in a low voice.
“Not at all,” said Alice: “she’s so extremely—” Just then she noticed that the Queen was close behind her, listening: so she went on “—likely to win, that it’s hardly worth while finishing the game.”

“I don’t see how he can ever finish, if he doesn’t begin.”

“Speak English!” said the Eaglet. “I don’t know the meaning of half those long words, and, what’s more, I don’t believe you do either!”

“It’s done by everyone minding their own business”

“what is the use of a book,’ thought Alice, ‘without pictures or conversations?'”

“How do you know I’m mad?” said Alice. “You must be,” said the Cat, “or you wouldn’t have come here.”

“It’ll be no use their putting their heads down and saying, ‘Come up again, dear!’ I shall only look up and say, ‘Who am I, then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I’ll come up — if not, I’ll stay down here till I’m somebody else’ — but, oh, dear!”

“You’re entirely bonkers. But I’ll tell you a secret all the best people are.”

“She generally gave herself very good advice (though she very seldom followed it), and sometimes she scolded herself so severely as to bring tears into her eyes;”

“What is the use of a book without pictures or conversations?

“meaning in it,” said the King, “that saves a world of trouble, you know, as we needn’t try to find any. Let the jury consider their verdict.”

“Mine is a long and a sad tale!’ said the Mouse, turning to Alice, and sighing. ‘It is a long tail, certainly,’ said Alice, looking down with wonder at the Mouse’s tail; ‘but why do you call it sad?”

“If you don’t know where you are going it doesn’t matter which road you take.”

“important—unimportant—unimportant—important—’ as if he were trying which word sounded best.”

“said the Knave, “I didn’t write it and they can’t prove that I did; there’s no name signed at the end.”

“Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again.”

“Alice felt so desperate that she was ready to ask help of any one; so, when the Rabbit came near her,”

“whether the pleasure of making a daisy-chain would be worth the trouble of getting up”

“I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only knew how to begin.”

“Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin.’ For,”

“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat. ‘I don’t much care where—’ said Alice. ‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat.”

“about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to”

“had plenty of time as she went down to look about her and to wonder what was going to happen next. First, she tried to look down and make out what she was coming to, but it was too dark to see anything;”

“and illustrations are in the public domain and are free to use, reproduce, or alter as desired. Cover and”

“get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice”

“get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank,”

“considering in her own mind (as well as she could, for the”

“Down, down, down. Would the fall never come to an end! ‘I wonder how many miles I’ve”

“Who am I then? Tell me that first, and then, if I like being that person, I’ll come up: if not, I’ll stay down here till I’m somebody else”–but,”

“learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no”

“learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off”

“either, but thought they were nice grand words to say.) Presently she began again. ‘I wonder if I shall fall right through”

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’ ‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat. ‘I don’t much care where—’ said Alice. ‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat.”

“down, I think–‘ (for, you see, Alice had learnt several things of this sort in her lessons in the schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good”

“If it had grown up,’ she said to herself, ‘it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think.’ And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs,”

“schoolroom, and though this was not a VERY good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her, still it was good practice to say it over) ‘–yes, that’s about the right distance–but then I wonder what Latitude or Longitude I’ve got to?”

“very poor speaker,” said the King. “You may go,” said the King, and the Hatter hurriedly left the court.”

“Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. ‘Dinah’ll miss me very much to-night, I should think!’ (Dinah was the cat.) ‘I hope they’ll remember her saucer of milk at tea-time. Dinah my dear! I wish you were down here with”

“I knew who I was this morning, but I’ve changed a few times since then.”

“Alice was not a bit hurt, and she jumped up on to her feet in a moment: she looked up, but it was all dark overhead; before her was another long passage, and the White Rabbit was still in sight, hurrying down it. There was not”

“Suddenly she came upon a little three-legged table, all made of solid glass; there was nothing on it except a tiny golden key, and Alice’s first thought was that it might belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too small, but”

“Alice, ‘it would be of very little use without my shoulders. Oh, how I wish I could shut up like a telescope! I think I could, if I only know how to begin.’ For, you see, so many out-of-the-way things had happened lately, that Alice had begun to think that very”

“poison” or not’; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-hot poker”

“How do you know I’m mad?’ said Alice. ‘You must be,’ said the Cat, ‘or you wouldn’t have come here.’ Alice”

“turned pale,”

“pues a esta curiosa criatura le gustaba mucho pretender que era dos personas a la vez.”

“They were obliged to have him with them,’ the Mock Turtle said: ‘no wise fish would go anywhere without a porpoise.”

“A Mad Tea-Party”
? Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland
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“we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.”

“Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon began talking again. ‘Dinah’ll miss me very much to-night, I should think!’ (Dinah was the cat.) ‘I hope they’ll remember her saucer”

“we’re all mad here. I’m”

“repeated with”

“howling alternately”

“were placed along the course, here and there. There was no ‘One, two, three, and away,’ but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over. However, when they had been running half an hour or so, and were quite dry again, the”

“WATCH OUT OF ITS WAISTCOAT-POCKET, and looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and fortunately was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under the hedge. In another moment”

“—Yo, señor, en realidad no sé quién soy en este momento, aunque esta mañana lo sabía muy bien cuando me levanté, ¡pero he cambiado tantas veces desde entonces!”

“the Rabbit say to itself, ‘Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be late!’ (when she thought it over afterwards, it occurred to her that she ought to have wondered at this, but at the time it all seemed quite natural); but when the Rabbit actually TOOK A WATCH OUT OF ITS WAISTCOAT-POCKET,”

“people that walk with their heads downward! The Antipathies, I think–‘ (she was rather glad there WAS no one listening, this time, as”

“she saw maps and pictures hung upon pegs. She took down a jar from one of the shelves as she passed;”

“And what an ignorant little girl she’ll think me for asking! No, it’ll never do to ask: perhaps I shall see it written up somewhere.’ Down, down, down. There was nothing else to do, so Alice soon”

“earls of Mercia and Northumbria, declared for him: and even Stigand, the patriotic archbishop of Canterbury, found it advisable–“‘ ‘Found what?’ said the Duck. ‘Found it,’ the Mouse replied rather crossly: ‘of course”

“hand with Dinah, and saying to her very earnestly, ‘Now, Dinah, tell me the truth: did you ever eat a bat?’ when suddenly, thump! thump!”

“You don’t know much,’ said the Dutchess; ‘and that’s a fact.”

“belong to one of the doors of the hall; but, alas! either the locks were too large, or the key was too”

“we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.’ ‘How do you know I’m mad?’ said Alice. ‘You must be,’ said the Cat, ‘or you wouldn’t have come here.”

“unimportant–important–‘ as”

“her, calling out in a confused way, ‘Prizes! Prizes!’ Alice had no idea what to do, and in despair she put her hand in her pocket, and pulled out a box of comfits, (luckily the”

“know,’ said the Mouse. ‘Of course,’ the Dodo replied very gravely. ‘What else have you got in your pocket?’ he went”

“and her eyes immediately met those of a large caterpillar, that was sitting on the top with its arms folded, quietly smoking a long hookah,”

“next thing was to eat the comfits: this caused some noise and confusion, as”

“and graphic design elements and alterations are property of Bookbyte Digital and may be used as long as credit”

“She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom followed it),”

“Ah, my dear! Let this be a lesson to you never to lose your temper!’ ‘Hold your tongue, Ma!’ said the young Crab, a little snappishly. ‘You’re enough to try the patience of an oyster!’ ‘I wish I had our Dinah here, I know I do!’ said Alice aloud, addressing nobody in particular.”

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

“If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?”

“Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle.”

“Curiouser and curiouser!”

“If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does.”

“Mad Hatter: “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?”
“Have you guessed the riddle yet?” the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.
“No, I give it up,” Alice replied: “What’s the answer?”
“I haven’t the slightest idea,” said the Hatter”

“Why it’s simply impassible!
Alice: Why, don’t you mean impossible?
Door: No, I do mean impassible. (chuckles) Nothing’s impossible!”

“Alice:How long is forever? White Rabbit:Sometimes, just one second.”

“If you drink much from a bottle marked ‘poison’ it is certain to disagree with you sooner or later.”

“Contrariwise,’ continued Tweedledee, ‘if it was so, it might be; and if it were so, it would be; but as it isn’t, it ain’t. That’s logic.”

“The time has come,” the walrus said, “to talk of many things: Of shoes and ships – and sealing wax – of cabbages and kings”

“Alice: Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?
The Cheshire Cat: That depends a good deal on where you want to get to.
Alice: I don’t much care where.
The Cheshire Cat: Then it doesn’t much matter which way you go.
Alice: …So long as I get somewhere.
The Cheshire Cat: Oh, you’re sure to do that, if only you walk long enough.”

“I knew who I was this morning, but I’ve changed a few times since then.”

“Where should I go?” -Alice. “That depends on where you want to end up.” – The Cheshire Cat.”

“It’s a poor sort of memory that only works backwards,’ says the White Queen to Alice.”

“Speak in French when you can’t think of the English for a thing–
turn your toes out when you walk—
And remember who you are!”

“Why is a raven like a writing desk?”

“ALICE
She drank from a bottle called DRINK ME
And she grew so tall,
She ate from a plate called TASTE ME
And down she shrank so small.
And so she changed, while other folks
Never tried nothin’ at all.”

“We’re all mad here.”

“These things do not happen in dreams, dear girl,’ he said, vanishing up to his neck. ‘They happen only in nightmares.’
His head spiralled and he was gone.”

“I don’t like the looks of it,’ said the King: ‘however, it may kis my hand, if it likes.’
‘I’d rather not,’ the Cat remarked.”

“Well, I never heard it before, but it sounds uncommon nonsense.”

“Yes, that’s it! Said the Hatter with a sigh, it’s always tea time.”

“No wise fish would go anywhere without a porpoise.”

“Either it brings tears to their eyes, or else -”
“Or else what?” said Alice, for the Knight had made a sudden pause.
“Or else it doesn’t, you know.”

“When I’m a Duchess,” she said to herself (not in a very hopeful tone though), “I won’t have any pepper in my kitchen at all. Soup does very well without. Maybe it’s always pepper that makes people hot-tempered,” she went on, very much pleased at having found out a new kind of rule, “and vinegar that makes them sour—and camomile that makes them bitter—and—and barley-sugar and such things that make children sweet-tempered. I only wish people knew that; then they wouldn’t be so stingy about it, you know—”

“Why is a raven like a writing desk? – Mad Hatter
I haven’t the slightest idea. – Alice”

“If you don’t know where you want to go, then it doesn’t matter which path you take.”

“You’re entirely bonkers. But I’ll tell you a secret: All the best people are.”

“The more there is of mine, the less there is of yours”

“Mad Hatter: “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?”
“Have you guessed the riddle yet?” the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.
“No, I give it up,” Alice replied: “What’s the answer?”
“I haven’t the slightest idea,” said the Hatter”

“have i gone mad?
im afraid so, but let me tell you something, the best people usualy are.”

“Alice:How long is forever? White Rabbit:Sometimes, just one second.”

“We’re all mad here.”

“I’m afraid I can’t explain myself, sir. Because I am not myself, you see?”

“My dear, here we must run as fast as we can, just to stay in place. And if you wish to go anywhere you must run twice as fast as that.”

“Take some more tea,” the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.
“I’ve had nothing yet,” Alice replied in an offended tone, “so I can’t take more.”
“You mean you can’t take less,” said the Hatter: “it’s very easy to take more than nothing.”
“Nobody asked your opinion,” said Alice.”

“If you don’t know where you are going any road can take you there”

“I wonder if I’ve been changed in the night. Let me think. Was I the same when I got up this morning? I almost think I can remember feeling a little different. But if I’m not the same, the next question is ‘Who in the world am I?’ Ah, that’s the great puzzle!”

“Off with their heads!”

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.”

“Begin at the beginning,” the King said, very gravely, “and go on till you come to the end: then stop.”

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?”
“That depends a good deal on where you want to get to.”
“I don’t much care where –”
“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go.”

“Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle.”

“Curiouser and curiouser!”

“If everybody minded their own business, the world would go around a great deal faster than it does.”

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